Electrical resistance increases at the tissue-electrode interface as an early response to nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation

Rajas P. Kale, Abbas Z. Kouzani, Julian Berk, Ken Walder, Michael Berk, Susannah J Tye

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The therapeutic actions of deep brain stimulation are not fully understood. The early inflammatory response of electrode implantation is associated with symptom relief without electrical stimulation, but is negated by anti-inflammatory drugs. Early excitotoxic necrosis and subsequent glial scarring modulate the conductivity of the tissue-electrode interface, which can provide some detail into the inflammatory response of individual patients. The feasibility of this was demonstrated by measuring resistance values across a bipolar electrode which was unilaterally implanted into the nucleus accumbens of a rat while receiving continuous deep brain stimulation with a portable back-mounted device using clinical parameters (130Hz, 200μ, 90μs) for 3 days. Daily resistance values rose significantly (p<0.0001), while hourly resistance analysis demonstrated a plateau after an initial spike in resistance, which was then followed by a steady increase (p<0.05; p<0.0001). We discuss that the biphasic nature of the inflammatory response may contribute to these observations and conclude that this method may translate to a safe predictive screening for more effective clinical deep brain stimulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2016
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1814-1817
Number of pages4
Volume2016-October
ISBN (Electronic)9781457702204
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2016
Event38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2016 - Orlando, United States
Duration: Aug 16 2016Aug 20 2016

Other

Other38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2016
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period8/16/168/20/16

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Kale, R. P., Kouzani, A. Z., Berk, J., Walder, K., Berk, M., & Tye, S. J. (2016). Electrical resistance increases at the tissue-electrode interface as an early response to nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation. In 2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2016 (Vol. 2016-October, pp. 1814-1817). [7591071] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2016.7591071