Efficacy of prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as treatment of severe gastroparesis: One center's experience

John K. DiBaise, Eamonn M M Quigley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intravenous erythromycin is a potent gastric prokinetic with demonstrated efficacy in the acute therapy of gastroparesis; long-term oral therapy has been limited by tolerance and modest efficacy. Our aim was to review our experience with prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as therapy for severe gastroparesis, refractory to usual dietary and oral prokinetic regimens. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with gastroparesis treated with intravenous erythromycin for at least 1 month. Information on demographics; origin of gastroparesis; dosage, duration, and route of administration; clinical outcome in the short- and longer-term; and complications were determined. Eleven patients received a total of 14 courses of intravenous erythromycin for a median of 6.5 months (range, 1 to 19 months) at a median dosage of 300 mg/day (range, 150 to 1,000 mg/day). One patient received no benefit, two had complete responses, and all others reported some benefit. Two had dramatic relapse on cessation of therapy and subsequently improved on its resumption. Parenteral nutrition could be discontinued in one of four patients. There were four episodes of line sepsis; two required catheter removal. A nonocclusive thrombus developed at the site of a central line in one patient. Secondary infections or antibiotic resistance were not encountered. Prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting is feasible, well tolerated, and effective in patients with severe gastroparesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-134
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastroparesis
Erythromycin
Intravenous Administration
Therapeutics
Parenteral Nutrition
Microbial Drug Resistance
Coinfection
Sepsis
Stomach
Thrombosis
Catheters
Demography
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Erythromycin
  • Gastroparesis
  • Intravenous
  • Macroide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Efficacy of prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as treatment of severe gastroparesis : One center's experience. / DiBaise, John K.; Quigley, Eamonn M M.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 28, No. 2, 1999, p. 131-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{69aacec103ad498bbad087d650218f9a,
title = "Efficacy of prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as treatment of severe gastroparesis: One center's experience",
abstract = "Intravenous erythromycin is a potent gastric prokinetic with demonstrated efficacy in the acute therapy of gastroparesis; long-term oral therapy has been limited by tolerance and modest efficacy. Our aim was to review our experience with prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as therapy for severe gastroparesis, refractory to usual dietary and oral prokinetic regimens. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with gastroparesis treated with intravenous erythromycin for at least 1 month. Information on demographics; origin of gastroparesis; dosage, duration, and route of administration; clinical outcome in the short- and longer-term; and complications were determined. Eleven patients received a total of 14 courses of intravenous erythromycin for a median of 6.5 months (range, 1 to 19 months) at a median dosage of 300 mg/day (range, 150 to 1,000 mg/day). One patient received no benefit, two had complete responses, and all others reported some benefit. Two had dramatic relapse on cessation of therapy and subsequently improved on its resumption. Parenteral nutrition could be discontinued in one of four patients. There were four episodes of line sepsis; two required catheter removal. A nonocclusive thrombus developed at the site of a central line in one patient. Secondary infections or antibiotic resistance were not encountered. Prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting is feasible, well tolerated, and effective in patients with severe gastroparesis.",
keywords = "Erythromycin, Gastroparesis, Intravenous, Macroide",
author = "DiBaise, {John K.} and Quigley, {Eamonn M M}",
year = "1999",
doi = "10.1097/00004836-199903000-00009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "131--134",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology",
issn = "0192-0790",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficacy of prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as treatment of severe gastroparesis

T2 - One center's experience

AU - DiBaise, John K.

AU - Quigley, Eamonn M M

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Intravenous erythromycin is a potent gastric prokinetic with demonstrated efficacy in the acute therapy of gastroparesis; long-term oral therapy has been limited by tolerance and modest efficacy. Our aim was to review our experience with prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as therapy for severe gastroparesis, refractory to usual dietary and oral prokinetic regimens. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with gastroparesis treated with intravenous erythromycin for at least 1 month. Information on demographics; origin of gastroparesis; dosage, duration, and route of administration; clinical outcome in the short- and longer-term; and complications were determined. Eleven patients received a total of 14 courses of intravenous erythromycin for a median of 6.5 months (range, 1 to 19 months) at a median dosage of 300 mg/day (range, 150 to 1,000 mg/day). One patient received no benefit, two had complete responses, and all others reported some benefit. Two had dramatic relapse on cessation of therapy and subsequently improved on its resumption. Parenteral nutrition could be discontinued in one of four patients. There were four episodes of line sepsis; two required catheter removal. A nonocclusive thrombus developed at the site of a central line in one patient. Secondary infections or antibiotic resistance were not encountered. Prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting is feasible, well tolerated, and effective in patients with severe gastroparesis.

AB - Intravenous erythromycin is a potent gastric prokinetic with demonstrated efficacy in the acute therapy of gastroparesis; long-term oral therapy has been limited by tolerance and modest efficacy. Our aim was to review our experience with prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting as therapy for severe gastroparesis, refractory to usual dietary and oral prokinetic regimens. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with gastroparesis treated with intravenous erythromycin for at least 1 month. Information on demographics; origin of gastroparesis; dosage, duration, and route of administration; clinical outcome in the short- and longer-term; and complications were determined. Eleven patients received a total of 14 courses of intravenous erythromycin for a median of 6.5 months (range, 1 to 19 months) at a median dosage of 300 mg/day (range, 150 to 1,000 mg/day). One patient received no benefit, two had complete responses, and all others reported some benefit. Two had dramatic relapse on cessation of therapy and subsequently improved on its resumption. Parenteral nutrition could be discontinued in one of four patients. There were four episodes of line sepsis; two required catheter removal. A nonocclusive thrombus developed at the site of a central line in one patient. Secondary infections or antibiotic resistance were not encountered. Prolonged administration of intravenous erythromycin in an ambulatory setting is feasible, well tolerated, and effective in patients with severe gastroparesis.

KW - Erythromycin

KW - Gastroparesis

KW - Intravenous

KW - Macroide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032970218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032970218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00004836-199903000-00009

DO - 10.1097/00004836-199903000-00009

M3 - Article

C2 - 10078820

AN - SCOPUS:0032970218

VL - 28

SP - 131

EP - 134

JO - Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

JF - Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

SN - 0192-0790

IS - 2

ER -