Effects of testosterone administration on nocturnal cortisol secretion in healthy older men

Ranganath Muniyappa, Johannes D Veldhuis, S. Mitchell Harman, John D. Sorkin, Marc R. Blackman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In animal studies, testosterone decreases, whereas estrogen increases, cortisol production. In one clinical study, short-term testosterone replacement attenuated corticotrophin-releasing hormone-stimulated cortisol secretion during leuprolide-induced hypogonadism in young men. The effects of longer term testosterone treatment on spontaneous cortisol secretion in younger or older men are unknown. In a randomized, double-masked placebo-controlled study, we assessed the effects of testosterone supplementation (100 mg intramuscular every 2 week) for 26 weeks on nocturnal cortisol secretory dynamics in healthy older men. Testosterone administration increased early morning serum concentrations of free testosterone by 34%, decreased sex hormone-binding globulin by 20%, and did not alter early morning concentrations of cortisol-binding globulin or cortisol compared with placebo treatment. Testosterone did not significantly alter nocturnal mean and integrated cortisol concentrations, cortisol burst frequency, mass/burst, basal secretion, pulsatile cortisol production rate, pattern regularity, or approximate entropy. We conclude that low-dose testosterone supplementation for 26 weeks does not affect spontaneous nocturnal cortisol secretion in healthy older men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1185-1192
Number of pages8
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume65 A
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
Placebos
Leuprolide
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Hypogonadism
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Entropy
Estrogens
Therapeutics
Serum

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cortisol
  • Testosterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of testosterone administration on nocturnal cortisol secretion in healthy older men. / Muniyappa, Ranganath; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Harman, S. Mitchell; Sorkin, John D.; Blackman, Marc R.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 65 A, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 1185-1192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muniyappa, Ranganath ; Veldhuis, Johannes D ; Harman, S. Mitchell ; Sorkin, John D. ; Blackman, Marc R. / Effects of testosterone administration on nocturnal cortisol secretion in healthy older men. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2010 ; Vol. 65 A, No. 11. pp. 1185-1192.
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