Effect of the combination of music and nature sounds on pain and anxiety in cardiac surgical patients

A randomized study

Susanne M. Cutshall, Patricia G. Anderson, Sharon K. Prinsen, Laura J. Wentworth, Tammy L. Olney, Penny K. Messner, Karen M. Brekke, Zhuo Li, Thoralf M. Sundt, Ryan F. Kelly, Brent A Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background • Postoperative pain and anxiety are common in cardiac surgery patients. Studies have suggested that music can decrease anxiety in hospitalized patients. Primary Study Objective • This study focused on the efficacy and feasibility of special music, which included nature sounds, for pain and anxiety. Methods/Design • In this randomized controlled trial, postoperative cardiovascular surgery patients were randomly assigned to a music group to receive 20 minutes of standard postoperative care and music twice daily on postoperative days 2 through 4 or to a control group to receive 20 minutes of standard care with a quiet resting period twice daily on postoperative days 2 through 4. Setting • Cardiovascular surgical unit of Saint Marys Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota. Participants • One hundred patients completed the study (music group, n = 49; control group, n = 51). Intervention • The music was delivered through CD players in the patients' rooms. Primary Outcome Measures • Pain, anxiety, satisfaction, and relaxation were evaluated from visual analog scales. Results • Data showed a significant decrease in mean (SD) pain scores after the second session of day 2 for the music group (change, -1.4 [1.4]) compared with the control group (change, -0.4 [1.4]) (P =.001). Mean relaxation scores improved more at the first session of day 2 for the music group (change, 1.9 [2.7]) compared with the control group (change, 0.3 [2.9]) (P =.03). The music group also showed lower anxiety and increased satisfaction overall, but these differences were not statistically significant. No major barriers to using the therapy were identified. Conclusion • Recorded music and nature sounds can be integrated into the postoperative care of cardiovascular surgery patients. The recordings may provide an additional means for addressing common symptoms of pain and anxiety while providing a means of relaxation for these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-23
Number of pages8
JournalAlternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Music
Anxiety
Pain
Control Groups
Postoperative Care
Patients' Rooms
Standard of Care
Postoperative Pain
Visual Analog Scale
Thoracic Surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Cutshall, S. M., Anderson, P. G., Prinsen, S. K., Wentworth, L. J., Olney, T. L., Messner, P. K., ... Bauer, B. A. (2011). Effect of the combination of music and nature sounds on pain and anxiety in cardiac surgical patients: A randomized study. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 17(4), 16-23.

Effect of the combination of music and nature sounds on pain and anxiety in cardiac surgical patients : A randomized study. / Cutshall, Susanne M.; Anderson, Patricia G.; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Wentworth, Laura J.; Olney, Tammy L.; Messner, Penny K.; Brekke, Karen M.; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Kelly, Ryan F.; Bauer, Brent A.

In: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 4, 07.2011, p. 16-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cutshall, SM, Anderson, PG, Prinsen, SK, Wentworth, LJ, Olney, TL, Messner, PK, Brekke, KM, Li, Z, Sundt, TM, Kelly, RF & Bauer, BA 2011, 'Effect of the combination of music and nature sounds on pain and anxiety in cardiac surgical patients: A randomized study', Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 16-23.
Cutshall, Susanne M. ; Anderson, Patricia G. ; Prinsen, Sharon K. ; Wentworth, Laura J. ; Olney, Tammy L. ; Messner, Penny K. ; Brekke, Karen M. ; Li, Zhuo ; Sundt, Thoralf M. ; Kelly, Ryan F. ; Bauer, Brent A. / Effect of the combination of music and nature sounds on pain and anxiety in cardiac surgical patients : A randomized study. In: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 16-23.
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abstract = "Background • Postoperative pain and anxiety are common in cardiac surgery patients. Studies have suggested that music can decrease anxiety in hospitalized patients. Primary Study Objective • This study focused on the efficacy and feasibility of special music, which included nature sounds, for pain and anxiety. Methods/Design • In this randomized controlled trial, postoperative cardiovascular surgery patients were randomly assigned to a music group to receive 20 minutes of standard postoperative care and music twice daily on postoperative days 2 through 4 or to a control group to receive 20 minutes of standard care with a quiet resting period twice daily on postoperative days 2 through 4. Setting • Cardiovascular surgical unit of Saint Marys Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota. Participants • One hundred patients completed the study (music group, n = 49; control group, n = 51). Intervention • The music was delivered through CD players in the patients' rooms. Primary Outcome Measures • Pain, anxiety, satisfaction, and relaxation were evaluated from visual analog scales. Results • Data showed a significant decrease in mean (SD) pain scores after the second session of day 2 for the music group (change, -1.4 [1.4]) compared with the control group (change, -0.4 [1.4]) (P =.001). Mean relaxation scores improved more at the first session of day 2 for the music group (change, 1.9 [2.7]) compared with the control group (change, 0.3 [2.9]) (P =.03). The music group also showed lower anxiety and increased satisfaction overall, but these differences were not statistically significant. No major barriers to using the therapy were identified. Conclusion • Recorded music and nature sounds can be integrated into the postoperative care of cardiovascular surgery patients. The recordings may provide an additional means for addressing common symptoms of pain and anxiety while providing a means of relaxation for these patients.",
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AU - Kelly, Ryan F.

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