Effect of deoxycholic acid ingestion on bile acid metabolism and biliary lipid secretion in normal subjects

Nicholas F La Russo, P. A. Szczepanik, A. F. Hofmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of deoxycholate ingestion, 750 mg per day, on bile acid kinetics, biliary bile acid composition, and biliary lipid secretion was studied in 7 healthy volunteers. Bile acid kinetics were measured by isotope dilution, and hourly outputs of bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid were quantitated by a duodenal perfusion technique during a 24 hr period which included three liquid meals and an overnight fast. Biliary bile acid composition was assessed by coupled gas chromatography mass spectrometry. After deoxycholic acid ingestion, biliary bile acids became composed of predominantly deoxycholyl conjugates, and deoxycholic acid pools increased 4 fold. Both chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid pools decreased, and daily synthesis of each of the primary bile acids was inhibited by 50%. Total bile acid pools did not change in any consistent manner. Daily bile acid secretion increased slightly during deoxycholic acid ingestion, and recycling frequency varied reciprocally with the total bile acid pool both before and during deoxycholic acid treatment. Deoxycholic acid ingestion caused no change in either the daily secretion of cholesterol or lecithin, or the cholesterol saturation of fasting state bile, which remained unsaturated throughout the study. SGOT levels increased to 4 times the upper limits of normal in 2 of 7 subjects, but these levels promptly returned to normal when deoxycholate feeding was stopped. Serum cholesterol levels decreased in every subject (average 15%) during deoxycholic acid administration. No evidence for a direct role of deoxycholate in the pathogenesis of cholesterol cholelithiasis was obtained in these studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-140
Number of pages9
JournalGastroenterology
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1977

Fingerprint

Deoxycholic Acid
Bile Acids and Salts
Lipid Metabolism
Eating
Cholesterol
Cholic Acid
Cholelithiasis
Lecithins
Recycling
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Bile
Isotopes
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Meals
Fasting
Phospholipids
Healthy Volunteers
Perfusion
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Effect of deoxycholic acid ingestion on bile acid metabolism and biliary lipid secretion in normal subjects. / La Russo, Nicholas F; Szczepanik, P. A.; Hofmann, A. F.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 72, No. 1, 1977, p. 132-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1b08ad0faaa540ac8fc63de85ead3e52,
title = "Effect of deoxycholic acid ingestion on bile acid metabolism and biliary lipid secretion in normal subjects",
abstract = "The effect of deoxycholate ingestion, 750 mg per day, on bile acid kinetics, biliary bile acid composition, and biliary lipid secretion was studied in 7 healthy volunteers. Bile acid kinetics were measured by isotope dilution, and hourly outputs of bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid were quantitated by a duodenal perfusion technique during a 24 hr period which included three liquid meals and an overnight fast. Biliary bile acid composition was assessed by coupled gas chromatography mass spectrometry. After deoxycholic acid ingestion, biliary bile acids became composed of predominantly deoxycholyl conjugates, and deoxycholic acid pools increased 4 fold. Both chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid pools decreased, and daily synthesis of each of the primary bile acids was inhibited by 50{\%}. Total bile acid pools did not change in any consistent manner. Daily bile acid secretion increased slightly during deoxycholic acid ingestion, and recycling frequency varied reciprocally with the total bile acid pool both before and during deoxycholic acid treatment. Deoxycholic acid ingestion caused no change in either the daily secretion of cholesterol or lecithin, or the cholesterol saturation of fasting state bile, which remained unsaturated throughout the study. SGOT levels increased to 4 times the upper limits of normal in 2 of 7 subjects, but these levels promptly returned to normal when deoxycholate feeding was stopped. Serum cholesterol levels decreased in every subject (average 15{\%}) during deoxycholic acid administration. No evidence for a direct role of deoxycholate in the pathogenesis of cholesterol cholelithiasis was obtained in these studies.",
author = "{La Russo}, {Nicholas F} and Szczepanik, {P. A.} and Hofmann, {A. F.}",
year = "1977",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "72",
pages = "132--140",
journal = "Gastroenterology",
issn = "0016-5085",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of deoxycholic acid ingestion on bile acid metabolism and biliary lipid secretion in normal subjects

AU - La Russo, Nicholas F

AU - Szczepanik, P. A.

AU - Hofmann, A. F.

PY - 1977

Y1 - 1977

N2 - The effect of deoxycholate ingestion, 750 mg per day, on bile acid kinetics, biliary bile acid composition, and biliary lipid secretion was studied in 7 healthy volunteers. Bile acid kinetics were measured by isotope dilution, and hourly outputs of bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid were quantitated by a duodenal perfusion technique during a 24 hr period which included three liquid meals and an overnight fast. Biliary bile acid composition was assessed by coupled gas chromatography mass spectrometry. After deoxycholic acid ingestion, biliary bile acids became composed of predominantly deoxycholyl conjugates, and deoxycholic acid pools increased 4 fold. Both chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid pools decreased, and daily synthesis of each of the primary bile acids was inhibited by 50%. Total bile acid pools did not change in any consistent manner. Daily bile acid secretion increased slightly during deoxycholic acid ingestion, and recycling frequency varied reciprocally with the total bile acid pool both before and during deoxycholic acid treatment. Deoxycholic acid ingestion caused no change in either the daily secretion of cholesterol or lecithin, or the cholesterol saturation of fasting state bile, which remained unsaturated throughout the study. SGOT levels increased to 4 times the upper limits of normal in 2 of 7 subjects, but these levels promptly returned to normal when deoxycholate feeding was stopped. Serum cholesterol levels decreased in every subject (average 15%) during deoxycholic acid administration. No evidence for a direct role of deoxycholate in the pathogenesis of cholesterol cholelithiasis was obtained in these studies.

AB - The effect of deoxycholate ingestion, 750 mg per day, on bile acid kinetics, biliary bile acid composition, and biliary lipid secretion was studied in 7 healthy volunteers. Bile acid kinetics were measured by isotope dilution, and hourly outputs of bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid were quantitated by a duodenal perfusion technique during a 24 hr period which included three liquid meals and an overnight fast. Biliary bile acid composition was assessed by coupled gas chromatography mass spectrometry. After deoxycholic acid ingestion, biliary bile acids became composed of predominantly deoxycholyl conjugates, and deoxycholic acid pools increased 4 fold. Both chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid pools decreased, and daily synthesis of each of the primary bile acids was inhibited by 50%. Total bile acid pools did not change in any consistent manner. Daily bile acid secretion increased slightly during deoxycholic acid ingestion, and recycling frequency varied reciprocally with the total bile acid pool both before and during deoxycholic acid treatment. Deoxycholic acid ingestion caused no change in either the daily secretion of cholesterol or lecithin, or the cholesterol saturation of fasting state bile, which remained unsaturated throughout the study. SGOT levels increased to 4 times the upper limits of normal in 2 of 7 subjects, but these levels promptly returned to normal when deoxycholate feeding was stopped. Serum cholesterol levels decreased in every subject (average 15%) during deoxycholic acid administration. No evidence for a direct role of deoxycholate in the pathogenesis of cholesterol cholelithiasis was obtained in these studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017323763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017323763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 318580

AN - SCOPUS:0017323763

VL - 72

SP - 132

EP - 140

JO - Gastroenterology

JF - Gastroenterology

SN - 0016-5085

IS - 1

ER -