Economic Evaluation of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction

Derek S. Chew, Zak Loring, Jatin Anand, Marat Fudim, Angela Lowenstern, Jennifer A. Rymer, Kristin E.D. Weimer, Brett D. Atwater, Adam D. Devore, Derek V. Exner, Peter A. Noseworthy, Clyde W. Yancy, Daniel B. Mark, Jonathan P. Piccini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction may improve survival and other cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: We constructed a decision-Analytic Markov model to estimate the costs and benefits of catheter ablation and medical management in patients with symptomatic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%) and atrial fibrillation over a lifetime horizon. Evidence from the published literature informed the model inputs, including clinical effectiveness data from meta-Analyses. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. A 3% discount rate was applied to both future costs and benefits. The primary outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio assessed from the US health care sector perspective. Results: Catheter ablation was associated with 6.47 (95% CI, 5.89-6.93) quality-Adjusted life years (QALYs) and a total cost of $105 657 (95% CI, $55 311-$191 934; 2018 US dollars), compared with 5.30 (95% CI, 5.20-5.39) QALYs and $63 040 (95% CI, $37 624-$102 260) for medical management. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for catheter ablation compared with medical management was $38 496 (95% CI, $5583-$117 510) per QALY gained. Model inputs with the greatest variation on incremental cost-effectiveness ratio estimates were the cost of ablation and the effect of catheter ablation on mortality reduction. When assuming a more conservative estimate of the treatment effect of catheter ablation on mortality (hazard ratio of 0.86), the estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $74 403 per QALY gained. At a willingness-To-pay threshold of $100 000 per QALY gained, atrial fibrillation ablation was found to be economically favorable compared with medical management in 95% of simulations. Conclusions: Catheter ablation in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients and atrial fibrillation may be considered economically attractive at current benchmarks for societal willingness-To-pay in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)981-990
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • atrial fibrillation
  • catheter ablation
  • costs and cost analysis
  • heart failure
  • mortality
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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