Dynamic neuromuscular analysis training for preventing anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes.

Timothy Hewett, Gregory D. Myer, Kevin R. Ford, James R. Slauterbeck

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Female athletes are four to six times more likely to sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than male athletes. Since the enactment of Title IX, male athletic participation at the high school level has remained steady (3.8 million), whereas female athletic participation has increased tenfold (from 0.3 to 3.0 million). Geometric growth in athletic participation and the higher injury rate in female athletes have led to gender inequity in ACL injury rates. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms such as during landing from a jump or while making a lateral pivot. Dynamic knee instability, caused by ligament dominance (decreased dynamic neuromuscular control of the joint), quadriceps dominance (decreased hamstring strength and recruitment), and leg dominance (side-to-side differences in strength and coordination) may be responsible for gender inequity in ACL injury rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-406
Number of pages10
JournalInstructional course lectures
Volume56
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Athletes
Sports
Ligaments
Leg
Knee
Joints
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dynamic neuromuscular analysis training for preventing anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes. / Hewett, Timothy; Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Slauterbeck, James R.

In: Instructional course lectures, Vol. 56, 2007, p. 397-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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