Doublets, triplets, or quadruplets of novel agents in newly diagnosed myeloma?

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Abstract

The treatment of multiple myeloma is evolving rapidly. A plethora of doublet, triplet, and quadruplet combinations have been studied for the treatment of newly diagnosed myeloma. Although randomized trials have been conducted comparing older regimens such as melphalan-prednisone with newer regimens containing drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, or bortezomib, there are few if any randomized trials that have compared modern combinations with each other. Even in the few trials that have done so, definitive overall survival or patient-reported quality-of-life differences have not been demonstrated. Therefore, there is marked heterogeneity in how newly diagnosed patients with myeloma are treated around the world. The choice of initial therapy is often dictated by availability of drugs, age and comorbidities of the patient, and assessment of prognosis and disease aggressiveness. This chapter reviews the current data on the most commonly used and tested doublet, triplet, and quadruplet combinations for the treatment of newly diagnosed myeloma and provides guidance on choosing the optimal initial treatment regimen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-361
Number of pages8
JournalHematology / the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program
Volume2012
StatePublished - 2012

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Therapeutics
Melphalan
Thalidomide
Prednisone
Multiple Myeloma
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Comorbidity
Quality of Life
Survival
lenalidomide
Bortezomib

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Doublets, triplets, or quadruplets of novel agents in newly diagnosed myeloma?",
abstract = "The treatment of multiple myeloma is evolving rapidly. A plethora of doublet, triplet, and quadruplet combinations have been studied for the treatment of newly diagnosed myeloma. Although randomized trials have been conducted comparing older regimens such as melphalan-prednisone with newer regimens containing drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, or bortezomib, there are few if any randomized trials that have compared modern combinations with each other. Even in the few trials that have done so, definitive overall survival or patient-reported quality-of-life differences have not been demonstrated. Therefore, there is marked heterogeneity in how newly diagnosed patients with myeloma are treated around the world. The choice of initial therapy is often dictated by availability of drugs, age and comorbidities of the patient, and assessment of prognosis and disease aggressiveness. This chapter reviews the current data on the most commonly used and tested doublet, triplet, and quadruplet combinations for the treatment of newly diagnosed myeloma and provides guidance on choosing the optimal initial treatment regimen.",
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