Does magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict residual disease in breast cancer?

Chee Chee H Stucky, Sarah A. McLaughlin, Amylou Dueck, Richard J. Gray, Marina E. Giurescu, Susanne G. Carpenter, Gwen M. Grimsby, Heidi A. Apsey, Barbara A Pockaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying residual disease after breast conservation therapy (BCT) is unclear. Method: Review of an institutional database identified patients with positive or close (≤2 mm) margins undergoing MRI before re-excision. Histopathologic correlation was performed. Results: Forty-three women underwent MRI after BCT. MRI suggested residual disease in 29 patients, of whom 20 (69%) had residual carcinoma pathologically. Nine patients had false-positive MRI as seen by benign pathology findings. Fourteen MRIs indicated no residual disease, of which 6 had residual disease pathologically. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of MRI was 77% and 69%, respectively. MRI conducted within 28 days of the original surgery was 85% sensitive. MRI performed after 28 days was 69% sensitive. Conclusions: MRI is able to detect residual disease among most patients undergoing re-excision. False-positive results may be caused by inflammatory processes that resemble residual disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-552
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume198
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Breast Neoplasms
Segmental Mastectomy
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Databases
Pathology
Carcinoma

Keywords

  • Breast conservation therapy (BCT)
  • Invasive breast cancer
  • magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Positive margins
  • re-excision
  • Residual disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Does magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict residual disease in breast cancer? / Stucky, Chee Chee H; McLaughlin, Sarah A.; Dueck, Amylou; Gray, Richard J.; Giurescu, Marina E.; Carpenter, Susanne G.; Grimsby, Gwen M.; Apsey, Heidi A.; Pockaj, Barbara A.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 198, No. 4, 10.2009, p. 547-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stucky, CCH, McLaughlin, SA, Dueck, A, Gray, RJ, Giurescu, ME, Carpenter, SG, Grimsby, GM, Apsey, HA & Pockaj, BA 2009, 'Does magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict residual disease in breast cancer?', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 198, no. 4, pp. 547-552. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.04.008
Stucky, Chee Chee H ; McLaughlin, Sarah A. ; Dueck, Amylou ; Gray, Richard J. ; Giurescu, Marina E. ; Carpenter, Susanne G. ; Grimsby, Gwen M. ; Apsey, Heidi A. ; Pockaj, Barbara A. / Does magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict residual disease in breast cancer?. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 198, No. 4. pp. 547-552.
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abstract = "Background: The accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying residual disease after breast conservation therapy (BCT) is unclear. Method: Review of an institutional database identified patients with positive or close (≤2 mm) margins undergoing MRI before re-excision. Histopathologic correlation was performed. Results: Forty-three women underwent MRI after BCT. MRI suggested residual disease in 29 patients, of whom 20 (69{\%}) had residual carcinoma pathologically. Nine patients had false-positive MRI as seen by benign pathology findings. Fourteen MRIs indicated no residual disease, of which 6 had residual disease pathologically. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of MRI was 77{\%} and 69{\%}, respectively. MRI conducted within 28 days of the original surgery was 85{\%} sensitive. MRI performed after 28 days was 69{\%} sensitive. Conclusions: MRI is able to detect residual disease among most patients undergoing re-excision. False-positive results may be caused by inflammatory processes that resemble residual disease.",
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