Development and Initial Validation of the Medical Fear Survey-Short Version

Bunmi O. Olatunji, Chad Ebesutani, Craig Sawchuk, Dean McKay, Jeffrey M. Lohr, Ronald A. Kleinknecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present investigation employs item response theory (IRT) to develop an abbreviated Medical Fear Survey (MFS). Application of IRT analyses in Study 1 (n = 931) to the original 50-item MFS resulted in a 25-item shortened version. Examination of the location parameters also resulted in a reduction of the Likert-type scaling of the MFS by removing the last response category ("Terror"). The five subscales of the original MFS were highly correlated with those of the MFS-short version. The short version also displayed comparable convergent and discriminant validity with the original MFS in relation to measures of fear, disgust, and anxiety. Confirmatory factor analysis in Study 2 revealed that the five-factor structure of the MFS-short form fit the data well in U.S. (n = 283) and Dutch (n = 258) samples. The short form also had comparable convergent and discriminant validity with the original MFS in relation to domains of disgust in both samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in Study 3 demonstrated that the subscales of the short version were comparable with the original MFS in classifying participants high (n = 40) and low (n = 40) in blood/injection phobia. Last, structural equation modeling in Study 4 (n = 113) revealed that the MFS-short form demonstrated excellent convergent/discriminant validity with strong associations with injection fear and no association with spider fear. These findings suggest that the MFS-short form has considerable strengths, including decreased assessment time, while retaining sound psychometric properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-336
Number of pages19
JournalAssessment
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fear
Surveys and Questionnaires
Injections
Spiders
Phobic Disorders
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Statistical Factor Analysis
Anxiety

Keywords

  • disgust
  • item response theory
  • medical fear
  • MFS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Olatunji, B. O., Ebesutani, C., Sawchuk, C., McKay, D., Lohr, J. M., & Kleinknecht, R. A. (2012). Development and Initial Validation of the Medical Fear Survey-Short Version. Assessment, 19(3), 318-336. https://doi.org/10.1177/1073191111415368

Development and Initial Validation of the Medical Fear Survey-Short Version. / Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Ebesutani, Chad; Sawchuk, Craig; McKay, Dean; Lohr, Jeffrey M.; Kleinknecht, Ronald A.

In: Assessment, Vol. 19, No. 3, 02.08.2012, p. 318-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olatunji, BO, Ebesutani, C, Sawchuk, C, McKay, D, Lohr, JM & Kleinknecht, RA 2012, 'Development and Initial Validation of the Medical Fear Survey-Short Version', Assessment, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 318-336. https://doi.org/10.1177/1073191111415368
Olatunji, Bunmi O. ; Ebesutani, Chad ; Sawchuk, Craig ; McKay, Dean ; Lohr, Jeffrey M. ; Kleinknecht, Ronald A. / Development and Initial Validation of the Medical Fear Survey-Short Version. In: Assessment. 2012 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 318-336.
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