Depression and five year survival following acute myocardial infarction: A prospective study

Robert M. Carney, Kenneth E. Freedland, Brian Steinmeyer, James A. Blumenthal, Lisa F. Berkman, Lana L. Watkins, Susan M. Czajkowski, Matthew M. Burg, Allan S Jaffe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Depression has been shown to be a risk factor for mortality during the 12 months following an acute myocardial infarction (MI), but few studies have examined whether it is associated with increased risk over longer periods. Most of the existing studies utilized depression questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews, the gold standard for clinical depression diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether interview-diagnosed clinical depression affects survival for at least 5 years after an acute MI. Vital status was determined for 163 patients with major depression, 195 with minor depression or dysthymia, and 408 nondepressed patients, during a median follow-up period of 60 months after an acute MI. Survival analysis was used to model time from the index MI to death. There were 106 deaths during the follow-up. After adjusting for other risk factors for mortality, patients with either major or minor depression (HR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.19 to 2.60), major depression alone (HR = 1.87; 95% CI: 1.17 to 2.98), or minor depression alone (HR = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.06 to 2.64) were at higher risk for all-cause mortality compared to the nondepressed patients. Depression is an independent risk factor for death 5 years after an acute MI. Even minor depression is associated with an increased risk. Although it is not known whether treating depression can improve survival, patients with depression should be recognized as being at increased risk long after their acute MI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume109
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Myocardial Infarction
Prospective Studies
Survival
Mortality
Interviews
Survival Analysis

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Depressive disorder
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Carney, R. M., Freedland, K. E., Steinmeyer, B., Blumenthal, J. A., Berkman, L. F., Watkins, L. L., ... Jaffe, A. S. (2008). Depression and five year survival following acute myocardial infarction: A prospective study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 109(1-2), 133-138. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2007.12.005

Depression and five year survival following acute myocardial infarction : A prospective study. / Carney, Robert M.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Steinmeyer, Brian; Blumenthal, James A.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Watkins, Lana L.; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Burg, Matthew M.; Jaffe, Allan S.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 109, No. 1-2, 07.2008, p. 133-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carney, RM, Freedland, KE, Steinmeyer, B, Blumenthal, JA, Berkman, LF, Watkins, LL, Czajkowski, SM, Burg, MM & Jaffe, AS 2008, 'Depression and five year survival following acute myocardial infarction: A prospective study', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 109, no. 1-2, pp. 133-138. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2007.12.005
Carney RM, Freedland KE, Steinmeyer B, Blumenthal JA, Berkman LF, Watkins LL et al. Depression and five year survival following acute myocardial infarction: A prospective study. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2008 Jul;109(1-2):133-138. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2007.12.005
Carney, Robert M. ; Freedland, Kenneth E. ; Steinmeyer, Brian ; Blumenthal, James A. ; Berkman, Lisa F. ; Watkins, Lana L. ; Czajkowski, Susan M. ; Burg, Matthew M. ; Jaffe, Allan S. / Depression and five year survival following acute myocardial infarction : A prospective study. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2008 ; Vol. 109, No. 1-2. pp. 133-138.
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