Depressed versus nondepressed young adult tobacco users: Differences in coping style, weight concerns, and exercise level

Kristin S. Vickers, Christi A. Patten, Kristi Lane, Matthew M. Clark, Ivana T. Croghan, Darrell R. Schroeder, Richard D. Hurt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Undergraduates age 18 to 24 years (n = 656) completed questionnaires assessing tobacco use, depressive symptoms, coping responses, weight concerns, and exercise. The majority of participants were female (72%), White/ non-Hispanic (95%), and in the 1st or 2nd year of college (80%). Current tobacco users (n = 236) had a higher frequency of depression (40%) than never tobacco users (32%; p = .05). Tobacco users classified as depressed (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [CES-D] score ≥ 16) reported greater weight concerns and more frequent maladaptive coping in response to negative mood than tobacco users classified as nondepressed (CES-D score < 16). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that higher maladaptive coping and lower level of exercise were significantly associated with depression among tobacco users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-503
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Depression
  • Exercise
  • Tobacco use
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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