Deployment of a mixed-mode data collection strategy does not reduce nonresponse bias in a general population health survey

Timothy J. Beebe, Donna D. McAlpine, Jeanette Y. Ziegenfuss, Sarah Jenkins, Lindsey Haas, Michael E. Davern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To assess nonresponse bias in a mixed-mode general population health survey. Data Sources Secondary analysis of linked survey sample frame and administrative data, including demographic and health-related information. Study Design The survey was administered by mail with telephone follow-up to nonrespondents after two mailings. To determine whether an additional mail contact or mode switch reduced nonresponse bias, we compared all respondents (N = 3,437) to respondents from each mailing and telephone respondents to the sample frame (N = 6,716). Principal Findings Switching modes did not minimize the under-representation of younger people, nonwhites, those with congestive heart failure, high users of office-based services, and low-utilizers of the emergency room but did reduce the over-representation of older adults. Conclusions Multiple contact and mixed-mode surveys may increase response rates, but they do not necessarily reduce nonresponse bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1739-1754
Number of pages16
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Keywords

  • Health survey methods
  • mailed survey
  • mixed-mode survey
  • nonresponse bias
  • telephone survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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