Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo

Yanyan Lou, Gang Wang, Gregory Lizée, Grace J. Kim, Steven E. Finkelstein, Chiguang Feng, Nicholas P. Restifo, Patrick Hwu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) have been well characterized for their ability to initiate cell-mediated immune responses by stimulating naive T cells. However, the use of DCs to stimulate antigen-activated T cells in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we determined whether DC vaccination could improve the efficacy of activated, adoptively transferred T cells to induce an enhanced antitumor immune response. Mice bearing B16 melanoma tumors expressing the gp100 tumor antigen were treated with cultured, activated T cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specifically recognizing gp100, with or without concurrent peptide-pulsed DC vaccination. In this model, antigen-specific DC vaccination induced cytokine production, enhanced proliferation, and increased tumor infiltration of adoptively transferred T cells. Furthermore, the combination of DC vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer led to a more robust antitumor response than the use of each treatment individually. Collectively, these findings illuminate a new potential application for DCs in the in vivo stimulation of adoptively transferred T cells and may be a useful approach for the immunotherapy of cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6783-6790
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume64
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dendritic Cells
T-Lymphocytes
Vaccination
Antigens
Neoplasms
Experimental Melanomas
Adoptive Transfer
Neoplasm Antigens
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Immunotherapy
Cytokines
Peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Lou, Y., Wang, G., Lizée, G., Kim, G. J., Finkelstein, S. E., Feng, C., ... Hwu, P. (2004). Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo. Cancer Research, 64(18), 6783-6790. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1621

Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo. / Lou, Yanyan; Wang, Gang; Lizée, Gregory; Kim, Grace J.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Feng, Chiguang; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Hwu, Patrick.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 64, No. 18, 15.09.2004, p. 6783-6790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lou, Y, Wang, G, Lizée, G, Kim, GJ, Finkelstein, SE, Feng, C, Restifo, NP & Hwu, P 2004, 'Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo', Cancer Research, vol. 64, no. 18, pp. 6783-6790. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1621
Lou, Yanyan ; Wang, Gang ; Lizée, Gregory ; Kim, Grace J. ; Finkelstein, Steven E. ; Feng, Chiguang ; Restifo, Nicholas P. ; Hwu, Patrick. / Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo. In: Cancer Research. 2004 ; Vol. 64, No. 18. pp. 6783-6790.
@article{317d03665f224f4abcc22a5a1955d398,
title = "Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo",
abstract = "Dendritic cells (DCs) have been well characterized for their ability to initiate cell-mediated immune responses by stimulating naive T cells. However, the use of DCs to stimulate antigen-activated T cells in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we determined whether DC vaccination could improve the efficacy of activated, adoptively transferred T cells to induce an enhanced antitumor immune response. Mice bearing B16 melanoma tumors expressing the gp100 tumor antigen were treated with cultured, activated T cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specifically recognizing gp100, with or without concurrent peptide-pulsed DC vaccination. In this model, antigen-specific DC vaccination induced cytokine production, enhanced proliferation, and increased tumor infiltration of adoptively transferred T cells. Furthermore, the combination of DC vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer led to a more robust antitumor response than the use of each treatment individually. Collectively, these findings illuminate a new potential application for DCs in the in vivo stimulation of adoptively transferred T cells and may be a useful approach for the immunotherapy of cancer.",
author = "Yanyan Lou and Gang Wang and Gregory Liz{\'e}e and Kim, {Grace J.} and Finkelstein, {Steven E.} and Chiguang Feng and Restifo, {Nicholas P.} and Patrick Hwu",
year = "2004",
month = "9",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1621",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "6783--6790",
journal = "Journal of Cancer Research",
issn = "0099-7013",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "18",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dendritic cells strongly boost the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T cells in vivo

AU - Lou, Yanyan

AU - Wang, Gang

AU - Lizée, Gregory

AU - Kim, Grace J.

AU - Finkelstein, Steven E.

AU - Feng, Chiguang

AU - Restifo, Nicholas P.

AU - Hwu, Patrick

PY - 2004/9/15

Y1 - 2004/9/15

N2 - Dendritic cells (DCs) have been well characterized for their ability to initiate cell-mediated immune responses by stimulating naive T cells. However, the use of DCs to stimulate antigen-activated T cells in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we determined whether DC vaccination could improve the efficacy of activated, adoptively transferred T cells to induce an enhanced antitumor immune response. Mice bearing B16 melanoma tumors expressing the gp100 tumor antigen were treated with cultured, activated T cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specifically recognizing gp100, with or without concurrent peptide-pulsed DC vaccination. In this model, antigen-specific DC vaccination induced cytokine production, enhanced proliferation, and increased tumor infiltration of adoptively transferred T cells. Furthermore, the combination of DC vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer led to a more robust antitumor response than the use of each treatment individually. Collectively, these findings illuminate a new potential application for DCs in the in vivo stimulation of adoptively transferred T cells and may be a useful approach for the immunotherapy of cancer.

AB - Dendritic cells (DCs) have been well characterized for their ability to initiate cell-mediated immune responses by stimulating naive T cells. However, the use of DCs to stimulate antigen-activated T cells in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we determined whether DC vaccination could improve the efficacy of activated, adoptively transferred T cells to induce an enhanced antitumor immune response. Mice bearing B16 melanoma tumors expressing the gp100 tumor antigen were treated with cultured, activated T cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specifically recognizing gp100, with or without concurrent peptide-pulsed DC vaccination. In this model, antigen-specific DC vaccination induced cytokine production, enhanced proliferation, and increased tumor infiltration of adoptively transferred T cells. Furthermore, the combination of DC vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer led to a more robust antitumor response than the use of each treatment individually. Collectively, these findings illuminate a new potential application for DCs in the in vivo stimulation of adoptively transferred T cells and may be a useful approach for the immunotherapy of cancer.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4644364500&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4644364500&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1621

DO - 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1621

M3 - Article

C2 - 15374997

AN - SCOPUS:4644364500

VL - 64

SP - 6783

EP - 6790

JO - Journal of Cancer Research

JF - Journal of Cancer Research

SN - 0099-7013

IS - 18

ER -