Deep brain stimulation of the internal segment of the globus pallidus in delayed runaway dyskinesia

Jonathan Graff-Radford, Kelly D. Foote, Ramon L. Rodriguez, Hubert H. Fernandez, Robert A. Hauser, Atchar Sudhyadhom, Christian A. Rosado, Justin C. Sanchez, Michael S. Okun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dyskinesias that occur during a period without medication after embryonic cell transplantation have been commonly reported in double-blind trials; however, to date, they have not been reported in the few patients who participated in open-label pilot studies. Design: Single case observation with preoperative and postoperative data, and intraoperative single-cell physiology. Patient: A patient who underwent embryonic cell transplantation in 1993 as part of the University of South Florida open-label study was referred for evaluation of intractable dyskinesia of the right arm. The dyskinesia was present during evaluation of the patient after a 12-hour period without medication and was clinically disabling. It was manifested as a severe groping movement of the hand. Intraoperative physiologic evaluation revealed decreased firing rates in the internal segment of the globus pallidus. Results: Deep brain stimulation of the internal segment of the globus pallidus resulted in resolution of the dyskinesia. Conclusion: This case highlights the delayed development of runaway dyskinesia after a period without medication as an important potential long-term adverse effect of embryonic cell transplantation in patients with Parkinson disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1181-1184
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume63
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Homeless Youth
Globus Pallidus
Deep Brain Stimulation
Dyskinesias
Cell Transplantation
Cell Physiological Phenomena
Parkinson Disease
Arm
Hand
Observation
Cells
Transplantation
Evaluation
Medication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Graff-Radford, J., Foote, K. D., Rodriguez, R. L., Fernandez, H. H., Hauser, R. A., Sudhyadhom, A., ... Okun, M. S. (2006). Deep brain stimulation of the internal segment of the globus pallidus in delayed runaway dyskinesia. Archives of Neurology, 63(8), 1181-1184. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.63.8.1181

Deep brain stimulation of the internal segment of the globus pallidus in delayed runaway dyskinesia. / Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Foote, Kelly D.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Fernandez, Hubert H.; Hauser, Robert A.; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Rosado, Christian A.; Sanchez, Justin C.; Okun, Michael S.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 63, No. 8, 01.08.2006, p. 1181-1184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graff-Radford, J, Foote, KD, Rodriguez, RL, Fernandez, HH, Hauser, RA, Sudhyadhom, A, Rosado, CA, Sanchez, JC & Okun, MS 2006, 'Deep brain stimulation of the internal segment of the globus pallidus in delayed runaway dyskinesia', Archives of Neurology, vol. 63, no. 8, pp. 1181-1184. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.63.8.1181
Graff-Radford, Jonathan ; Foote, Kelly D. ; Rodriguez, Ramon L. ; Fernandez, Hubert H. ; Hauser, Robert A. ; Sudhyadhom, Atchar ; Rosado, Christian A. ; Sanchez, Justin C. ; Okun, Michael S. / Deep brain stimulation of the internal segment of the globus pallidus in delayed runaway dyskinesia. In: Archives of Neurology. 2006 ; Vol. 63, No. 8. pp. 1181-1184.
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