Decellularization of bovine pericardium for tissue-engineering by targeted removal of xenoantigens

Ana C. Gonçalves, Leigh Griffiths, Russell V. Anthony, E. Christopher Orton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aim of study: Assessment of decellularization of xenogeneic biological scaffolds for tissue engineering has relied primarily on histological cellularity, though this may not ensure the removal of known xenogeneic antigens such as galactose-α1,3-galactose (α-gal) and MHC I. Methods: Bovine pericardium (BP) underwent standard (Std) decellularization consisting of hypotonic lysis and treatment with DNAse/RNAse. In addition to Std decellularization, tissues were treated for 24 h with either 0.5% Triton X-100, 0.5% sodium deoxycholate (SD), 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), α-galactosidase (5 U/ml) or phospholipase (PL) A2 (150 U/ml). Tissues underwent a 96-h washout under gentle agitation at 27°C, and then evaluated by light microscopy for % cellularity, and by immunohistochemistry and Western blot for α-gal, bovine MHC I and smooth muscle α-actin. Results: Standard treatment of BP resulted in only partial removal histological cellularity and persistence of α-gal, MHC I and α-actin. Adding SD treatment resulted in apparent acellularity, but persistence of xenogeneic antigens. Only the addition of SDS resulted in complete histological acellularity and removal of xenogeneic antigens. Treatment with α-galactosidase selectively removed α-gal from BP. Conclusion: Histological cellularity is not an adequate end-point for assuring removal of antigenicity from xenogeneic biological scaffolds. However, known xenogeneic antigens can be targeted for removal by novel decellularization treatments such as α-galactosidase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-217
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Heart Valve Disease
Volume14
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Heterophile Antigens
Pericardium
Tissue Engineering
Galactosidases
Deoxycholic Acid
Galactose
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Actins
Therapeutics
Phospholipases A2
Octoxynol
Smooth Muscle
Microscopy
Western Blotting
Immunohistochemistry
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Decellularization of bovine pericardium for tissue-engineering by targeted removal of xenoantigens. / Gonçalves, Ana C.; Griffiths, Leigh; Anthony, Russell V.; Orton, E. Christopher.

In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.12.2005, p. 212-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gonçalves, Ana C. ; Griffiths, Leigh ; Anthony, Russell V. ; Orton, E. Christopher. / Decellularization of bovine pericardium for tissue-engineering by targeted removal of xenoantigens. In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 212-217.
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