Cortical and subcortical cerebrovascular resistance index in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

Daniel A. Nation, Christina E. Wierenga, Lindsay R. Clark, Sheena I. Dev, Nikki H. Stricker, Amy J. Jak, David P. Salmon, Lisa Delano-Wood, Katherine J. Bangen, Robert A. Rissman, Thomas T. Liu, Mark W. Bondi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a well-established finding in Alzheimer's disease (AD), although fewer studies have examined the role of increased regional cerebrovascular resistance. By calculating the ratio of mean arterial pressure to rCBF, it is possible to estimate an index of regional cerebrovascular resistance (CVRi) that may be a sensitive measure of occult cerebrovascular disease. Objective: To compare probable AD patients to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal control (NC) participants on CVRi, the ratio of mean arterial pressure to rCBF. Methods: Eighty-one participants (12 AD, 23 MCI, 46 NC) were compared on CVRi using voxel-wise analyses. Region-of-interest analyses examined correlations between subcortical CVRi and both cognition and white matter lesion (WML) volume. Results: Voxel-wise analyses revealed CVRi elevation in AD relative to NCs (subcortical, medial temporal, posterior cingulate, precuneus, inferior parietal, superior temporal) and MCI (subcortical, posterior cingulate). MCI participants exhibited intermediate CVRi values within cortical and medial temporal areas. Significant CVRi clusters were larger and more widespread than those of parallel CBF analyses. Among MCI and AD participants, subcortical CVRi elevation was associated with lower Dementia Rating Scale score (r = -0.52, p = 0.001, for both thalamus and caudate), and caudate CVRi correlated with WML volume (r = 0.45, p = 0.001). Conclusions: Cortical and subcortical CVRi is elevated in AD, particularly within the caudate and thalamus, where it is associated with decreased cognitive performance and increased WMLs. Findings suggest CVRi may play a role in cognitive decline and cerebrovascular disease in MCI and AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-698
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cerebral blood flow
  • cerebrovascular resistance
  • mild cognitive impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cortical and subcortical cerebrovascular resistance index in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Nation, D. A., Wierenga, C. E., Clark, L. R., Dev, S. I., Stricker, N. H., Jak, A. J., Salmon, D. P., Delano-Wood, L., Bangen, K. J., Rissman, R. A., Liu, T. T., & Bondi, M. W. (2013). Cortical and subcortical cerebrovascular resistance index in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 36(4), 689-698. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-130086