Comparison of the surface wave method and the indentation method for measuring the elasticity of gelatin phantoms of different concentrations

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41 Scopus citations

Abstract

The speed of the surface Rayleigh wave, which is related to the viscoelastic properties of the medium, can be measured by noninvasive and noncontact methods. This technique has been applied in biomedical applications such as detecting skin diseases. Static spherical indentation, which quantifies material elasticity through the relationship between loading force and displacement, has been applied in various areas including a number of biomedical applications. This paper compares the results obtained from these two methods on five gelatin phantoms of different concentrations (5%, 7.5%, 10%, 12.5% and 15%). The concentrations are chosen because the elasticity of such gelatin phantoms is close to that of tissue types such as skin. The results show that both the surface wave method and the static spherical indentation method produce the same values for shear elasticity. For example, the shear elasticities measured by the surface wave method are 1.51, 2.75, 5.34, 6.90 and 8.40 kPa on the five phantoms, respectively. In addition, by studying the dispersion curve of the surface wave speed, shear viscosity can be extracted. The measured shear viscosities are 0.00, 0.00, 0.13, 0.39 and 1.22 Pa.s on the five phantoms, respectively. The results also show that the shear elasticity of the gelatin phantoms increases linearly with their prepared concentrations. The linear regressions between concentration and shear elasticity have R2 values larger than 0.98 for both methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-164
Number of pages8
JournalUltrasonics
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

Keywords

  • Gelatin phantom
  • Indentation
  • Surface wave
  • Viscoelasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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