Clinician knowledge, clinician barriers, and perceived parental barriers regarding human papillomavirus vaccination: Association with initiation and completion rates

Lila J Rutten, Jennifer St. Sauver, Timothy J. Beebe, Patrick M. Wilson, Debra J. Jacobson, Chun Fan, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Susan T. Vadaparampil, Robert M. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose We tested the hypothesis that clinician knowledge, clinician barriers, and perceived parental barriers relevant to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination account for the variation in vaccine delivery at the practice-site level. Methods We conducted a survey from October 2015 through January 2016 among primary care clinicians (n = 280) in a 27-county geographic region to assess clinician knowledge, clinician barriers, and perceived parental barriers regarding HPV vaccination. Primary care clinicians included family medicine physicians, general pediatricians, and family and pediatric nurse-practitioners. We also used the Rochester Epidemiology Project to measure HPV vaccination delivery. Specifically we used administrative data to measure receipt of at least one valid HPV vaccine dose (initiation) and receipt of three valid HPV vaccine doses (completion) among 9–18 year old patients residing in the same 27-county geographic region. We assessed associations of clinician survey data with variation in vaccine delivery at the clinical site using administrative data on patients aged 9–18 years (n = 68,272). Results Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that greater knowledge of HPV and the HPV vaccination was associated with higher rates of HPV vaccination initiation (Incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.05) and completion of three doses (IRR = 1.28). We also found support for the hypothesis that greater perceived parental barriers to the HPV vaccination were associated with lower rates of initiation (IRR = 0.94) and completion (IRR = 0.90). These IRRs were statistically significant even after adjustment for site-level characteristics including percent white, percent female, percent ages 9–13, and percent with government insurance or self-pay at each site. Conclusions Clinician knowledge and their report of the frequency of experiencing parental barriers are associated with HPV vaccine delivery rates—initiation and completion. Higher measures of knowledge correlated with higher rates. Fewer perceived occurrences of parental barriers correlated with lower rates. These data can guide efforts to improve HPV vaccine delivery in clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-169
Number of pages6
JournalVaccine
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2017

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Papillomaviridae
Vaccination
vaccination
Papillomavirus Vaccines
vaccines
Incidence
Primary Health Care
Family Nurse Practitioners
incidence
Vaccines
Pediatric Nurse Practitioners
Family Physicians
Insurance
dosage
pediatricians
Epidemiology
Medicine
insurance
nurses
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Keywords

  • Clinician barriers to vaccination
  • HPV vaccination completion
  • HPV vaccination initiation
  • Human papillomavirus vaccination
  • Parental barriers to vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Clinician knowledge, clinician barriers, and perceived parental barriers regarding human papillomavirus vaccination : Association with initiation and completion rates. / Rutten, Lila J; St. Sauver, Jennifer; Beebe, Timothy J.; Wilson, Patrick M.; Jacobson, Debra J.; Fan, Chun; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Jacobson, Robert M.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 35, No. 1, 03.01.2017, p. 164-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rutten, Lila J ; St. Sauver, Jennifer ; Beebe, Timothy J. ; Wilson, Patrick M. ; Jacobson, Debra J. ; Fan, Chun ; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen ; Vadaparampil, Susan T. ; Jacobson, Robert M. / Clinician knowledge, clinician barriers, and perceived parental barriers regarding human papillomavirus vaccination : Association with initiation and completion rates. In: Vaccine. 2017 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 164-169.
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AU - Wilson, Patrick M.

AU - Jacobson, Debra J.

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