Clinical features of 5,628 primary lung cancer patients: Experience at Mayo Clinic from 1997 to 2003

Ping Yang, Mark S. Allen, Marie C. Aubry, Jason A. Wampfler, Randolph Stuart Marks, Eric Edell, Stephen N Thibodeau, Alex Adjei, James Jett, Claude Deschamps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

315 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objectives: To improve the current understanding of the etiology and natural history of primary lung cancer, we need to study the dynamic changes of clinical presentation and prognosis among a large number of patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer. In this report, we present the clinical features and survival rates up to 5 years of a patient cohort. Design: We identified 5,628 primary lung cancer patients between 1997 and 2002 and followed them through 2003 using multiple, complementary resources. Measurements and results: Of the 5,628 patients, 58% were men with a mean age at lung cancer diagnosis of 66 years, and 42% were women with a mean age at diagnosis of 64 years. Ten percent were < 50 years, and 8% were > 80 years at diagnosis. A tobacco smoking history was present in 89% of patients, and 40% were smoking at the time of diagnosis. The estimated overall 5-year survival rates of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by disease stage was as follows: IA, 66%; IB, 53%; IIA, 42%; IIB, 36%; IIIA, 10%; IIIB, 12%; and IV, 4%. The 5-year survival rate of patients with small cell lung cancer was 22% for limited disease and 1% for extensive disease. Approximately 50% of all patients are participants in one or more research studies, and nearly 75% of these patients have donated biological specimens for research. Conclusion: The survival rate of this cohort of lung cancer patients was slightly improved compared with earlier reports, particularly for patients with low-stage NSCLC. Our patient and biospecimen resource has enabled us to obtain timely results from clinical and translational research of lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-462
Number of pages11
JournalChest
Volume128
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Lung Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Smoking
Translational Medical Research
Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Research
Lung Diseases
History

Keywords

  • Histology
  • Lung cancer
  • Overall survival
  • Referral bias
  • TNM staging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Clinical features of 5,628 primary lung cancer patients : Experience at Mayo Clinic from 1997 to 2003. / Yang, Ping; Allen, Mark S.; Aubry, Marie C.; Wampfler, Jason A.; Marks, Randolph Stuart; Edell, Eric; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Adjei, Alex; Jett, James; Deschamps, Claude.

In: Chest, Vol. 128, No. 1, 07.2005, p. 452-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Ping ; Allen, Mark S. ; Aubry, Marie C. ; Wampfler, Jason A. ; Marks, Randolph Stuart ; Edell, Eric ; Thibodeau, Stephen N ; Adjei, Alex ; Jett, James ; Deschamps, Claude. / Clinical features of 5,628 primary lung cancer patients : Experience at Mayo Clinic from 1997 to 2003. In: Chest. 2005 ; Vol. 128, No. 1. pp. 452-462.
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