Clinical and virologic effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients receiving chemotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Results of a randomized trial

Lawrence D. Kaplan, James O. Kahn, Suzanne Crowe, Donald W Northfelt, Padraic Neville, Howard Grossberg, Donald I. Abrams, Julie Tracey, John Mills, Paul A. Volberding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

154 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thirty patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) receiving chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) were randomized to receive either subcutaneous recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) or no additional therapy. Recombinant rGM-CSF (at a dose of 10-20 μg/kg/d) was given on days 1 to 10 (early rGM-CSF) to the first five patients, but was changed to days 4 to 13 (delayed rGM-CSF) of each chemotherapy cycle in subsequent patients. Compared with the control group (N = 10), the delayed rGM-CSF group (N = 11) had higher mean nadirs of the absolute neutrophil count (0.36 v 0.89 × 109/L; P = .009), shorter mean durations of neutropenia (4.9 v 1.3 days; P = .02), fewer chemotherapy cycles complicated by neutropenia and fever (67% v 27%; P = .001), fewer days hospitalized for fever and neutropenia (4.9 v 1.8; P = .004), fewer reductions in chemotherapy dosages, and less frequent delays in chemotherapy administration. No sig-nificant differences were observed between patients in the control group and those in the early rGM-CSF group (N = 5). Median levels of serum HIV-1 p24 antigen decreased to 18% and 17% of baseline values in control (N = 4) and rGM-CSF groups (N = 6), respectively, 1 week following administration of the first cycle of chemotherapy. In the third week after chemotherapy, median antigen levels remained below baseline in the control group, but rose to 243% of baseline values in the rGM-CSF group (P = .01), suggesting stimulation of HIV replication. The effect of this change in HIV activity on clinical outcome of treated patients could not be determined, and therefore the clinical significance of this finding remains unclear. Complete response rates of 67%, 70%, and 60% were observed in the control, delayed rGM-CSF, and early rGM-CSF groups, respectively, with corresponding survival times of 9.0, 11.4, and 8.0 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-940
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume9
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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