Clinical and molecular correlates of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection from two geographically diverse centers in Rochester, Minnesota, and Singapore

Shehara M. Mendis, Shawn Vasoo, Brian D. Johnston, Stephen B. Porter, Scott A. Cunningham, Sanjay R. Menon, Christine B. Teng, Partha P. De, Robin Patel, James R. Johnson, Ritu Banerjee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Escherichia coli bacteremia is caused mainly by sequence type complex 131 (STc131) and two clades within its fluoroquinolone-resistance-associated H30 subclone, H30R1 and H30Rx. We examined clinical and molecular correlates of E. coli bacteremia in two geographically distinct centers. We retrospectively studied 251 unique E. coli bloodstream isolates from 246 patients (48 from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN [MN], and 198 from Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore [SG]), from October 2013 through March 2014. Isolates underwent PCR for phylogroup, STc, BlaCTX-M type, and virulence gene profiles, and medical records were reviewed. Although STc131 accounted for 25 to 27% of all E. coli bacteremia isolates at each site, its extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-associated H30Rx clade was more prominent in SG than in MN (15% versus 4%; P = 0.04). In SG only, patients with STc131 (versus other E. coli STc isolates) were more likely to receive inactive initial antibiotics (odds ratio, 2.8; P = 0.005); this was true specifically for patients with H30Rx (odds ratio, 7.0; P = 0.005). H30Rx comprised 16% of community-onset bacteremia episodes in SG but none in MN. In SG, virulence scores were higher for H30Rx than for H30R1, non-H30 STc131, and non-STc131 isolates (P <0.02 for all comparisons). At neither site did mortality differ by clonal status. The ESBL-associated H30Rx clade was more prevalent and more often of community onset in SG, where it predicted inactive empirical treatment. The clonal distribution varies geographically and has potentially important clinical implications. Rapid susceptibility testing and clonal diagnostics for H30/H30Rx might facilitate earlier prescribing of active therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00937
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume62
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Escherichia coli
  • H30Rx
  • Medical outcomes
  • ST131
  • Virulence factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Mendis, S. M., Vasoo, S., Johnston, B. D., Porter, S. B., Cunningham, S. A., Menon, S. R., Teng, C. B., De, P. P., Patel, R., Johnson, J. R., & Banerjee, R. (2018). Clinical and molecular correlates of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection from two geographically diverse centers in Rochester, Minnesota, and Singapore. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 62(10), [e00937]. https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00937-18