Classifying neurocognitive disorders: The DSM-5 approach

Perminder S. Sachdev, Deborah Blacker, Dan G. Blazer, Mary Ganguli, Dilip V. Jeste, Jane S. Paulsen, Ronald Carl Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurocognitive disorders - including delirium, mild cognitive impairment and dementia - are characterized by decline from a previously attained level of cognitive functioning. These disorders have diverse clinical characteristics and aetiologies, with Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular disease, Lewy body disease, frontotemporal degeneration, traumatic brain injury, infections, and alcohol abuse representing common causes. This diversity is reflected by the variety of approaches to classifying these disorders, with separate groups determining criteria for each disorder on the basis of aetiology. As a result, there is now an array of terms to describe cognitive syndromes, various definitions for the same syndrome, and often multiple criteria to determine a specific aetiology. The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) provides a common framework for the diagnosis of neurocognitive disorders, first by describing the main cognitive syndromes, and then defining criteria to delineate specific aetiological subtypes of mild and major neurocognitive disorders. The DSM-5 approach builds on the expectation that clinicians and research groups will welcome a common language to deal with the neurocognitive disorders. As the use of these criteria becomes more widespread, a common international classification for these disorders could emerge for the first time, thus promoting efficient communication among clinicians and researchers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)634-642
Number of pages9
JournalNature Reviews Neurology
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2014

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Disorders
Lewy Body Disease
Delirium
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Alcoholism
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Language
Communication
Research Personnel
Infection
Research
Neurocognitive Disorders
Cognitive Dysfunction
Traumatic Brain Injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Sachdev, P. S., Blacker, D., Blazer, D. G., Ganguli, M., Jeste, D. V., Paulsen, J. S., & Petersen, R. C. (2014). Classifying neurocognitive disorders: The DSM-5 approach. Nature Reviews Neurology, 10(11), 634-642. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrneurol.2014.181

Classifying neurocognitive disorders : The DSM-5 approach. / Sachdev, Perminder S.; Blacker, Deborah; Blazer, Dan G.; Ganguli, Mary; Jeste, Dilip V.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Petersen, Ronald Carl.

In: Nature Reviews Neurology, Vol. 10, No. 11, 05.11.2014, p. 634-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sachdev, PS, Blacker, D, Blazer, DG, Ganguli, M, Jeste, DV, Paulsen, JS & Petersen, RC 2014, 'Classifying neurocognitive disorders: The DSM-5 approach', Nature Reviews Neurology, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 634-642. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrneurol.2014.181
Sachdev PS, Blacker D, Blazer DG, Ganguli M, Jeste DV, Paulsen JS et al. Classifying neurocognitive disorders: The DSM-5 approach. Nature Reviews Neurology. 2014 Nov 5;10(11):634-642. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrneurol.2014.181
Sachdev, Perminder S. ; Blacker, Deborah ; Blazer, Dan G. ; Ganguli, Mary ; Jeste, Dilip V. ; Paulsen, Jane S. ; Petersen, Ronald Carl. / Classifying neurocognitive disorders : The DSM-5 approach. In: Nature Reviews Neurology. 2014 ; Vol. 10, No. 11. pp. 634-642.
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