Chloroaluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine partitioning in normal and intimal hyperplastic artery in the rat: Implications for photodynamic therapy

Glenn M. LaMuraglia, Paolo Ortu, Thomas J Flotte, W. Gregory Roberts, Kevin T. Schomacker, N. R. ChandraSekar, Tayyaba Hasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy, the light activation of photosensitizers into cytotoxic mediators, has been a successful treatment for experimental intimal hyperplasia (IH). To understand the basis of the photosensitizer chloroaluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine (CASPc)-mediated photoinhibition of intimal hyperplasia in the rat common carotid artery model, we studied photosensitizer partitioning in hyperplastic as compared to normal arterial tissue. Serum clearance of CASPc is exponential with, a half-life of 300 minutes. Laser-induced fluorescence and spectrofluorimetric analyses of artery tissue demonstrated an approximately 60% lower uptake and retention of CASPc by normal arterial tissue as compared to arteries with IH; the differences become more pronounced at 24 h. Fluorescent microscopy of arterial tissue demonstrated increased uptake of the CASPc by the artery with IH. However, by 24 h it is primarily the IH tissue that has retained the CASPc, with clearance of the dye from the media of normal or hyperplastic arteries. These data demonstrate that IH, like neoplastic tissue, has an increased accumulation of CASPc compared to normal artery. The preferential partitioning into hyperplastic tissue has implications for therapeutic targeting of this cellular population with photodynamic therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1898-1905
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume142
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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    LaMuraglia, G. M., Ortu, P., Flotte, T. J., Roberts, W. G., Schomacker, K. T., ChandraSekar, N. R., & Hasan, T. (1993). Chloroaluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine partitioning in normal and intimal hyperplastic artery in the rat: Implications for photodynamic therapy. American Journal of Pathology, 142(6), 1898-1905.