Changing incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms: A population-based study

L. J. Melton, L. K. Bickerstaff, L. H. Hollier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The apparent incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms among Rochester, Minnesota residents increased seven-fold between 1951 and 1980, while the incidence of thoracic aortic aneurysms declined somewhat. Rates for abdominal aneurysms rose with age and were greater among men. The overall incidence in 1971-1980 was 36.5 per 100,000 person-years. While all clinical classes of abdominal aortic aneurysms became more frequent, the greatest rise in incidence was for small, asymptomatic, and uncomplicated aneurysms which suggested an important role for more complete case ascertainment in recent years. The secular trend in abdominal aortic aneurysm incidence seems to be different from that observed for stroke or for coronary heart disease in the same community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-386
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume120
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Incidence
Population
Aneurysm
Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm
Coronary Disease
Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Melton, L. J., Bickerstaff, L. K., & Hollier, L. H. (1984). Changing incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms: A population-based study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 120(3), 379-386.

Changing incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms : A population-based study. / Melton, L. J.; Bickerstaff, L. K.; Hollier, L. H.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 120, No. 3, 1984, p. 379-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Melton, LJ, Bickerstaff, LK & Hollier, LH 1984, 'Changing incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms: A population-based study', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 379-386.
Melton, L. J. ; Bickerstaff, L. K. ; Hollier, L. H. / Changing incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms : A population-based study. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1984 ; Vol. 120, No. 3. pp. 379-386.
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