Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Diagnosis, Clinical Implications, and Management Strategies in Atrial Fibrillation

Christopher V. DeSimone, Jonathan Graff-Radford, Majd A. El-Harasis, Alejandro Rabinstein, Samuel J Asirvatham, David Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

With an aging population, clinicians are more frequently encountering patients with atrial fibrillation who are also at risk of intracerebral hemorrhage due to cerebral amyloid angiopathy, the result of β-amyloid deposition in cerebral vessels. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is common among elderly patients, and is associated with an increased risk of intracerebral bleeding, especially with the use of anticoagulation. Despite this association, this entity is absent in current risk-benefit analysis models, which may result in underestimation of the chance of bleeding in the subset of patients with this disease. Determining the presence and burden of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is particularly important when planning to start or restart anticoagulation after an intracerebral hemorrhage. Given the lack of randomized trial data to guide management strategies, we discuss a heart-brain team approach that includes clinician-patient shared decision making for the use of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to diminish stroke risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1173-1182
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume70
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 29 2017

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Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s dementia
  • atrial fibrillation
  • cerebral amyloid angiopathy
  • direct oral anticoagulant
  • management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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