Balloon Angioplasty in Acute and Chronic Coronary Artery Disease

David Holmes, Ronald E. Vlietstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty has grown exponentially since its introduction. Currently, selection criteria include single-vessel and multivessel disease, stable and unstable angina, and acute infarction. The outcome depends on specific patient and angiographic characteristics. In ideal lesions, success rates should be greater than 90%, with low morbidity and mortality. With more severe and diffuse multivessel disease, success rates are lower and complication rates are higher. In these cases, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty still offers a reasonable option, provided complete revascularization can be achieved or the angina-producing lesion dilated. Numerous issues remain unresolved, including (1) the role of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty vs coronary surgery (currently being tested), (2) restenosis, which occurs in approximately 30% of treated lesions, and (3) organizational adjustments such as training and certification to maintain high standards of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2109-2115
Number of pages7
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume261
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 14 1989

Fingerprint

Coronary Balloon Angioplasty
Balloon Angioplasty
Coronary Artery Disease
Stable Angina
Unstable Angina
Certification
Standard of Care
Infarction
Patient Selection
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Balloon Angioplasty in Acute and Chronic Coronary Artery Disease. / Holmes, David; Vlietstra, Ronald E.

In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 261, No. 14, 14.04.1989, p. 2109-2115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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