Bailout and corrective use of Gianturco-Roubin flex stents after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Operator reports and angiographic core laboratory verification from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/New Approaches to Coronary Intervention Registry

Larry S. Dean, Charles J. George, Gary S. Roubin, Elizabeth D. Kennard, David R. Holmes, Spencer B. King, Ronald E. Vlietstra, Jeffery W. Moses, Dean Kereiakes, Joseph P. Carrozza, Stephen G. Ellis, James R. Margolis, Katherine M. Detre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We sought to determine the in-hospital clinical outcome and angiographic results of patients prospectively entered into the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/New Approaches to Coronary Intervention (NHLBI/NACI) Registry who received Gianturco-Roubin stents as an unplanned new device. Background. Between August 1990 and March 1994, nine centers implanted Gianturco-Roubin flex stents as an unplanned new device in the initial treatment of 350 patients (389 lesions) who were prospectively enrolled in the NHLBI/NACI Registry. Methods. Patients undergoing implantation of the Gianturco-Roubin flex stent were prospectively entered into the Gianturco-Roubin stent portion of the NHLBI/NACI Registry. Only subjects receiving the Gianturco-Roubin stent as a new device in an unplanned fashion are included. Results. The mean age of the patient group was 61.8 years, and the majority of the patients were men. A history of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) was present in 35.4% of the group, and 16.9% had previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Unstable angina was present in 67.7%. Double- or triple-vessel coronary artery disease was present in 55.4%, and the average ejection fraction was 58%. The presence of thrombus was noted in 7.3%, and 7.2% had moderate to severe tortuosity of the lesion. The angiographic success rate was 92%. Individual clinical sites reported that 66.3% of the stents were placed after suboptimal PTCA, 20.3% for abrupt closure and 13.4% for some other technical PTCA failure. Major in-hospital events occurred in 9.7% of patients, including death in 1.7%, Q wave myocardial infarction in 3.1% and emergency bypass surgery in 6%. Abrupt closure of a stented segment occurred in 3.1% of patients at a mean of 3.9 days. Cerebrovascular accident occurred in 0.3%, and transfusion was required in 10.6%. Vascular events with surgical repair occurred in 8.6% of patients. Conclusions. Despite these complications, the use of this device for the treatment of a failed or suboptimal PTCA result remains promising given the adverse outcome of abrupt closure with conventional (nonstent) treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)934-940
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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