Autonomic and hemodynamic responses and interactions during the Mueller maneuver in humans

Virend Somers, Mark E. Dyken, Jonathan L. Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

We compared the responses to a Mueller maneuver maintained for 20 s to effects of an equal period of end expiratory apnea. We measured heart rate, mean blood pressure (BP), central venous pressure (CVP), and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in 9 normal humans. The Mueller maneuver was accompanied by a fall in CVP from 5 ± 1.2 to - 13 ± 3.2 mmHg (P < 0.05). During the first 10 s of Mueller, BP fell from 95 ± 4.2 to 81 ± 5.5 mmHg and SNA fell as low as 16 ± 6% of control (P < 0.05). For the 5 s prior to release SNA increased to 236 ± 36% (P < 0.05), and BP began to increase. Release of the Mueller resulted in a surge in BP to 104 ± 5.8 mmHg and suppression of SNA to 61 ± 48% (P < 0.05). By contrast, there was no fall in BP or CVP during apnea and SNA increased to 188 ± 24% for the first 5 s. Between 16 and 20 s of apnea SNA was 231 ± 52% and BP increased from 92 ± 3.1 to 96 ± 3.6 mmHg (P < 0.05). Release of apnea resulted in a surge in BP to 105 ± 3.0 mmHg and suppression of SNA to 30 ± 12% (P < 0.05). Oscillations in BP and SNA during the Mueller maneuver may contribute to similar oscillations, and hence cardiovascular consequences, in patients with sleep apnea.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-259
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Autonomic Nervous System
Volume44
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apnea
  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rate
  • Sympathetic nerve activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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