Atopic dermatitis: Skin care and topical therapies

David M. Fleischer, Jeremy Udkoff, Jenna Borok, Adam Friedman, Noreen Nicol, Jeffrey Bienstock, Peter Lio, Megha M Tollefson, Lawrence F. Eichenfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) pathogenesis is strongly influenced by Type 2 innate lymphoid cell and T-helper cell type 2 lymphocyte-driven inflammation and skin barrier dysfunction. AD therapies attempt to correct this pathology, and guidelines suggest suggest basics of AD therapy, which include repair of the skin barrier through bathing practices and moisturizers, infection control, and further lifestyle modifications to avoid and reduce AD triggers.While some patients' AD may be controlled using these measures, inflammatory eczema including acute flares and maintenance therapy in more severe patients are treated with topical pharmacologic agents such as topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and, more recently, topical PDE-4 inhibitors. This model of basic skin therapy and, as needed, topical pharmacologic agents may be used to treat the vast majority of patients with AD and remains the staple of AD therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Skin Care
Atopic Dermatitis
Skin
Therapeutics
Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors
Lymphocytes
Th2 Cells
Eczema
Infection Control
Life Style
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Guidelines
Pathology
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Fleischer, D. M., Udkoff, J., Borok, J., Friedman, A., Nicol, N., Bienstock, J., ... Eichenfield, L. F. (2017). Atopic dermatitis: Skin care and topical therapies. Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, 36(3), 104-111. https://doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.2017.035

Atopic dermatitis : Skin care and topical therapies. / Fleischer, David M.; Udkoff, Jeremy; Borok, Jenna; Friedman, Adam; Nicol, Noreen; Bienstock, Jeffrey; Lio, Peter; Tollefson, Megha M; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.

In: Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 104-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fleischer, DM, Udkoff, J, Borok, J, Friedman, A, Nicol, N, Bienstock, J, Lio, P, Tollefson, MM & Eichenfield, LF 2017, 'Atopic dermatitis: Skin care and topical therapies', Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 104-111. https://doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.2017.035
Fleischer DM, Udkoff J, Borok J, Friedman A, Nicol N, Bienstock J et al. Atopic dermatitis: Skin care and topical therapies. Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. 2017 Sep 1;36(3):104-111. https://doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.2017.035
Fleischer, David M. ; Udkoff, Jeremy ; Borok, Jenna ; Friedman, Adam ; Nicol, Noreen ; Bienstock, Jeffrey ; Lio, Peter ; Tollefson, Megha M ; Eichenfield, Lawrence F. / Atopic dermatitis : Skin care and topical therapies. In: Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. 2017 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 104-111.
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