Association of Changes in Effusion-Synovitis With Progression of Cartilage Damage Over Eighteen Months in Patients With Osteoarthritis and Meniscal Tear

the MeTeOR Investigator Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Synovitis is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and meniscal tear and has been associated with articular cartilage damage. This study was undertaken to examine the associations of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage in a cohort with OA and meniscal tear. Methods: We analyzed data from the Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research (MeTeOR) trial of surgery versus physical therapy for treatment of meniscal tear. We performed semiquantitative grading of effusion-synovitis and cartilage damage on magnetic resonance imaging, and dichotomized effusion-synovitis as none/small (minimal) and medium/large (extensive). We assessed the association of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage size and depth over 18 months, using Poisson regression models. Analyses were adjusted for patient demographic characteristics, treatment, and baseline cartilage damage. Results: We analyzed 221 participants. Over 18 months, effusion-synovitis was persistently minimal in 45.3% and persistently extensive in 21.3% of the patients. The remaining 33.5% of the patients had minimal synovitis on one occasion and extensive synovitis on the other. In adjusted analyses, patients with extensive effusion-synovitis at baseline had a relative risk (RR) of progression of cartilage damage depth of 1.7 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.0–2.7). Compared to those with persistently minimal effusion-synovitis, those with persistently extensive effusion-synovitis had a significantly increased risk of progression of cartilage damage depth (RR 2.0 [95% CI 1.1–3.4]). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the presence of extensive effusion-synovitis is associated with subsequent progression of cartilage damage over 18 months. The persistence of extensive effusion-synovitis over time is associated with the greatest risk of concurrent cartilage damage progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-81
Number of pages9
JournalArthritis and Rheumatology
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Synovitis
Tears
Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Confidence Intervals
Knee Osteoarthritis
Articular Cartilage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Association of Changes in Effusion-Synovitis With Progression of Cartilage Damage Over Eighteen Months in Patients With Osteoarthritis and Meniscal Tear. / the MeTeOR Investigator Group.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatology, Vol. 71, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 73-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Association of Changes in Effusion-Synovitis With Progression of Cartilage Damage Over Eighteen Months in Patients With Osteoarthritis and Meniscal Tear",
abstract = "Objective: Synovitis is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and meniscal tear and has been associated with articular cartilage damage. This study was undertaken to examine the associations of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage in a cohort with OA and meniscal tear. Methods: We analyzed data from the Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research (MeTeOR) trial of surgery versus physical therapy for treatment of meniscal tear. We performed semiquantitative grading of effusion-synovitis and cartilage damage on magnetic resonance imaging, and dichotomized effusion-synovitis as none/small (minimal) and medium/large (extensive). We assessed the association of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage size and depth over 18 months, using Poisson regression models. Analyses were adjusted for patient demographic characteristics, treatment, and baseline cartilage damage. Results: We analyzed 221 participants. Over 18 months, effusion-synovitis was persistently minimal in 45.3{\%} and persistently extensive in 21.3{\%} of the patients. The remaining 33.5{\%} of the patients had minimal synovitis on one occasion and extensive synovitis on the other. In adjusted analyses, patients with extensive effusion-synovitis at baseline had a relative risk (RR) of progression of cartilage damage depth of 1.7 (95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 1.0–2.7). Compared to those with persistently minimal effusion-synovitis, those with persistently extensive effusion-synovitis had a significantly increased risk of progression of cartilage damage depth (RR 2.0 [95{\%} CI 1.1–3.4]). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the presence of extensive effusion-synovitis is associated with subsequent progression of cartilage damage over 18 months. The persistence of extensive effusion-synovitis over time is associated with the greatest risk of concurrent cartilage damage progression.",
author = "{the MeTeOR Investigator Group} and MacFarlane, {Lindsey A.} and Heidi Yang and Collins, {Jamie E.} and Mohamed Jarraya and Ali Guermazi and Mandl, {Lisa A.} and Martin, {Scott D.} and John Wright and Elena Losina and Katz, {Jeffrey N.} and Brophy, {Robert H.} and Levy, {Bruce A} and Marx, {Robert G.} and Mathew Matava and Clare Safran-Norton and Spindler, {Kurt P.} and Michael Stuart and Dahm, {Diane L.} and Rick Wright",
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AU - the MeTeOR Investigator Group

AU - MacFarlane, Lindsey A.

AU - Yang, Heidi

AU - Collins, Jamie E.

AU - Jarraya, Mohamed

AU - Guermazi, Ali

AU - Mandl, Lisa A.

AU - Martin, Scott D.

AU - Wright, John

AU - Losina, Elena

AU - Katz, Jeffrey N.

AU - Brophy, Robert H.

AU - Levy, Bruce A

AU - Marx, Robert G.

AU - Matava, Mathew

AU - Safran-Norton, Clare

AU - Spindler, Kurt P.

AU - Stuart, Michael

AU - Dahm, Diane L.

AU - Wright, Rick

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N2 - Objective: Synovitis is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and meniscal tear and has been associated with articular cartilage damage. This study was undertaken to examine the associations of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage in a cohort with OA and meniscal tear. Methods: We analyzed data from the Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research (MeTeOR) trial of surgery versus physical therapy for treatment of meniscal tear. We performed semiquantitative grading of effusion-synovitis and cartilage damage on magnetic resonance imaging, and dichotomized effusion-synovitis as none/small (minimal) and medium/large (extensive). We assessed the association of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage size and depth over 18 months, using Poisson regression models. Analyses were adjusted for patient demographic characteristics, treatment, and baseline cartilage damage. Results: We analyzed 221 participants. Over 18 months, effusion-synovitis was persistently minimal in 45.3% and persistently extensive in 21.3% of the patients. The remaining 33.5% of the patients had minimal synovitis on one occasion and extensive synovitis on the other. In adjusted analyses, patients with extensive effusion-synovitis at baseline had a relative risk (RR) of progression of cartilage damage depth of 1.7 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.0–2.7). Compared to those with persistently minimal effusion-synovitis, those with persistently extensive effusion-synovitis had a significantly increased risk of progression of cartilage damage depth (RR 2.0 [95% CI 1.1–3.4]). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the presence of extensive effusion-synovitis is associated with subsequent progression of cartilage damage over 18 months. The persistence of extensive effusion-synovitis over time is associated with the greatest risk of concurrent cartilage damage progression.

AB - Objective: Synovitis is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and meniscal tear and has been associated with articular cartilage damage. This study was undertaken to examine the associations of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage in a cohort with OA and meniscal tear. Methods: We analyzed data from the Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research (MeTeOR) trial of surgery versus physical therapy for treatment of meniscal tear. We performed semiquantitative grading of effusion-synovitis and cartilage damage on magnetic resonance imaging, and dichotomized effusion-synovitis as none/small (minimal) and medium/large (extensive). We assessed the association of baseline effusion-synovitis and changes in effusion-synovitis with changes in cartilage damage size and depth over 18 months, using Poisson regression models. Analyses were adjusted for patient demographic characteristics, treatment, and baseline cartilage damage. Results: We analyzed 221 participants. Over 18 months, effusion-synovitis was persistently minimal in 45.3% and persistently extensive in 21.3% of the patients. The remaining 33.5% of the patients had minimal synovitis on one occasion and extensive synovitis on the other. In adjusted analyses, patients with extensive effusion-synovitis at baseline had a relative risk (RR) of progression of cartilage damage depth of 1.7 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.0–2.7). Compared to those with persistently minimal effusion-synovitis, those with persistently extensive effusion-synovitis had a significantly increased risk of progression of cartilage damage depth (RR 2.0 [95% CI 1.1–3.4]). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the presence of extensive effusion-synovitis is associated with subsequent progression of cartilage damage over 18 months. The persistence of extensive effusion-synovitis over time is associated with the greatest risk of concurrent cartilage damage progression.

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