Association of Blood Pressure Variability with Delirium in Patients with Critical Illness

Nika Zorko Garbajs, Diana J. Valencia Morales, Tarun D. Singh, Vitaly Herasevich, Andrew C. Hanson, Darrell R. Schroeder, Toby N. Weingarten, Ognjen Gajic, Juraj Sprung, Alejandro A. Rabinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The objective was to examine the association of blood pressure variability (BPV) during the first 24 h after intensive care unit admission with the likelihood of delirium and depressed alertness without delirium (“depressed alertness”). Methods: This retrospective, observational, cohort study included all consecutive adult patients admitted to an intensive care unit at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, from July 1, 2004, through October 31, 2015. The primary outcomes were delirium and delirium-free days, and the secondary outcomes included depressed alertness and depressed alertness-free days. Logistic regression was performed to determine the association of BPV with delirium and depressed alertness. Proportional odds regression was used to assess the association of BPV with delirium-free days and depressed alertness-free days. Results: Among 66,549 intensive care unit admissions, delirium was documented in 20.2% and depressed alertness was documented in 24.4%. Preserved cognition was documented in 55.4% of intensive care unit admissions. Increased systolic and diastolic BPV was associated with an increased odds of delirium and depressed alertness. The magnitude of the association per 5-mm Hg increase in systolic average real variability (the average of absolute value of changes between consecutive systolic blood pressure readings) was greater for delirium (odds ratio 1.34; 95% confidence interval 1.29–1.40; P < 0.001) than for depressed alertness (odds ratio 1.06; 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.10; P = 0.004). Increased systolic and diastolic BPV was associated with fewer delirium-free days but not with depressed alertness-free days. Conclusions: BPV in the first 24 h after intensive care unit admission is associated with an increased likelihood of delirium and fewer delirium-free days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurocritical care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Cognitive orientation
  • Critical illness
  • Delirium
  • Glasgow Coma Scale
  • Intensive care unit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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