Assessing the impact of health literacy on education retention of stroke patients

Kalina Sanders, Loretta Schnepel, Carmen Smotherman, William Livingood, Sunita Dodani, Nader Antonios, Katryne Lukens-Bull, Joyce Balls-Berry, Yvonne Johnson, Terri Miller, Wayne Hodges, Diane Falk, David Wood, Scott Silliman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Inadequate health literacy is a pervasive problem with major implications for reduced health status and health disparities. Despite the role of focused education in both primary and secondary prevention of stroke, the effect of health literacy on stroke education retention has not been reported. We examined the relationship of health literacy to the retention of knowledge after recommended stroke education. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at an urban safety-net hospital. Study subjects were patients older than 18 admitted to the hospital stroke unit with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke who were able to provide informed consent to participate (N = loo). Health literacy levels were measured by using the short form of Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Patient education was provided to patients at an inpatient stroke unit by using standardized protocols, in compliance with Joint Commission specifications. The education outcomes for poststroke care education, knowledge retention, was assessed for each subject. The effect of health literacy on the Stroke Patient Education Retention scores was assessed by using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Of the loo participating patients, 59% had inadequate to marginal health literacy. Stroke patients who had marginal health literacy (mean score, 7.45; standard deviation [SD], 1.9) or adequate health literacy (mean score, 7.31; SD, 1.76) had statistically higher education outcome scores than those identified as having inadequate health literacy (mean score, 5.58; SD, 2.06). Results from multivariate analysis indicated that adequate health literacy was most predictive of education outcome retention. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a clear relationship between health literacy and stroke education outcomes. Studies are needed to better understand the relationship of health literacy to key educational outcomes for primary or secondary prevention of stroke and to refine stroke education for literacy levels of high-risk populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130259
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Stroke
Education
Patient Education
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Health Status Disparities
Safety-net Providers
Multivariate Analysis
Hospital Units
Informed Consent
Inpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sanders, K., Schnepel, L., Smotherman, C., Livingood, W., Dodani, S., Antonios, N., ... Silliman, S. (2014). Assessing the impact of health literacy on education retention of stroke patients. Preventing Chronic Disease, 11(4), [130259]. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd11.130259

Assessing the impact of health literacy on education retention of stroke patients. / Sanders, Kalina; Schnepel, Loretta; Smotherman, Carmen; Livingood, William; Dodani, Sunita; Antonios, Nader; Lukens-Bull, Katryne; Balls-Berry, Joyce; Johnson, Yvonne; Miller, Terri; Hodges, Wayne; Falk, Diane; Wood, David; Silliman, Scott.

In: Preventing Chronic Disease, Vol. 11, No. 4, 130259, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanders, K, Schnepel, L, Smotherman, C, Livingood, W, Dodani, S, Antonios, N, Lukens-Bull, K, Balls-Berry, J, Johnson, Y, Miller, T, Hodges, W, Falk, D, Wood, D & Silliman, S 2014, 'Assessing the impact of health literacy on education retention of stroke patients', Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 11, no. 4, 130259. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd11.130259
Sanders K, Schnepel L, Smotherman C, Livingood W, Dodani S, Antonios N et al. Assessing the impact of health literacy on education retention of stroke patients. Preventing Chronic Disease. 2014 Jan 1;11(4). 130259. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd11.130259
Sanders, Kalina ; Schnepel, Loretta ; Smotherman, Carmen ; Livingood, William ; Dodani, Sunita ; Antonios, Nader ; Lukens-Bull, Katryne ; Balls-Berry, Joyce ; Johnson, Yvonne ; Miller, Terri ; Hodges, Wayne ; Falk, Diane ; Wood, David ; Silliman, Scott. / Assessing the impact of health literacy on education retention of stroke patients. In: Preventing Chronic Disease. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 4.
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