Arthroscopic versus open distal clavicle excision: Comparative results at six months and one year from a randomized, prospective clinical trial

Brett A. Freedman, Matthew A. Javernick, Frederick P. O'Brien, Amy E. Ross, William C. Doukas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to compare outcomes after arthroscopic versus open distal clavicle excision in the treatment of refractory acromioclavicular joint pain. A randomized, prospective clinical trial comparing the 6-month and 1-year outcomes of patients undergoing open distal clavicle excision (group 1) with those undergoing arthroscopic distal clavicle excision (group 2) was carried out. The Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons form, visual analog scale pain score, Short Form 36, and satisfaction questions were assessed preoperatively and at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Seventeen patients were enrolled. There was a trend across all measures for earlier or better outcomes (or both) after arthroscopic over open treatment. The improvement in visual analog scale pain score from preoperatively to 1 year postoperatively was significant for group 2 but not group 1 (P = .006 vs P = .13). Occult intra-articular pathology was detected and treated in 50% of group 2 patients. Arthroscopic and open distal clavicle excisions both provide significant pain reduction at 1 year. Both are effective surgeries for the treatment of refractory acromioclavicular joint pain. The ability to diagnosis and treat subtle concomitant shoulder pathology is a unique advantage of the arthroscopic approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-418
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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