Arterial dissections complicating cerebral angiography and cerebrovascular interventions

Harry J. Cloft, Mary E. Jensen, David F. Kallmes, Jacques E. Dion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Iatrogenic dissections are an uncommon complication of cerebral angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 12 cases of arterial dissections complicating cerebral angiography and cerebrovascular interventions to evaluate the clinical course of these dissections. METHODS: Cases from a large tertiary center performing a large number of neurovascular procedures were collected retrospectively. The patients' medical records and imaging studies were reviewed, with particular attention given to the cause of the dissection, the development of ischemic events resulting from the dissection, and the treatment used. RESULTS: Each of nine dissections affected a vertebral artery, each of two affected an internal carotid artery, and one affected a common carotid artery. The prevalence of iatrogenic dissections was 0.4%. Seven of the dissections were noted at the time of contrast material injection for the filming of cerebral angiograms. The other five dissections occurred during catheter or wire manipulations for interventional neuroradiologic procedures. Five of the patients in our series were treated with IV administered heparin for 24 to 48 hours. The other seven patients had recently suffered acute intracranial hemorrhage or undergone neurosurgery and could not undergo anticoagulant therapy. None of the patients developed symptoms of ischemia, but one was later found to have an asymptomatic infarct in the territory supplied by the dissected artery. CONCLUSION: Arterial dissections are an uncommon complication of cerebral angiography and cerebrovascular interventions and usually have a benign clinical course.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-545
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume21
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Arterial dissections complicating cerebral angiography and cerebrovascular interventions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this