Antibiotic Reservoir Injection Reduces Shunt Infection in Adults

Anthony M. Burrows, Meghan E. Murphy, David Daniels, Fredric B. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Shunt infections are a major complication following ventricular shunts in adults that lead to increased heath care costs, patient morbidity, and mortality. Methods to decrease shunt infection include antibiotic-impregnated catheters, protocol-based surgery, and shunt reservoir antibiotic injection. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review was performed for all adult shunt surgeries performed from January 2000 to September 2013 at a single academic institution. Records were cross-indexed with hospital billing records to identify patients who received antibiotic injections and cross-referenced with a prospective infection control database of all surgical site infections. The primary outcome measure was shunt infection within 1 year of surgery. Results Five-hundred thirteen adult patients met inclusion criteria. Antibiotic reservoir injection was associated with a significantly lower rate of infection (2.6%) when compared with no injection (6.3%, P = 0.0455). The antibiotic injection group also included significantly more patients with infection risk factors than the control group (38.8% vs. 18.0%, P < 0.005). Conclusion Antibiotic reservoir injection is an effective method of reducing shunt infections in adults when combined with standard infection control measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-111
Number of pages4
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume89
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

Anti-Bacterial Agents
Injections
Infection
Infection Control
Surgical Wound Infection
Hospital Records
Research Ethics Committees
Patient Care
Catheters
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Morbidity
Costs and Cost Analysis
Control Groups
Mortality

Keywords

  • Antibiotic reservoir injection
  • Antibiotic-impregnated shunt system
  • Infection
  • Key words Adults
  • Ventricular shunts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Antibiotic Reservoir Injection Reduces Shunt Infection in Adults. / Burrows, Anthony M.; Murphy, Meghan E.; Daniels, David; Meyer, Fredric B.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 89, 01.05.2016, p. 108-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burrows, Anthony M. ; Murphy, Meghan E. ; Daniels, David ; Meyer, Fredric B. / Antibiotic Reservoir Injection Reduces Shunt Infection in Adults. In: World Neurosurgery. 2016 ; Vol. 89. pp. 108-111.
@article{7e9bcc7c546a45edbda5af7fafa03f4d,
title = "Antibiotic Reservoir Injection Reduces Shunt Infection in Adults",
abstract = "Background Shunt infections are a major complication following ventricular shunts in adults that lead to increased heath care costs, patient morbidity, and mortality. Methods to decrease shunt infection include antibiotic-impregnated catheters, protocol-based surgery, and shunt reservoir antibiotic injection. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review was performed for all adult shunt surgeries performed from January 2000 to September 2013 at a single academic institution. Records were cross-indexed with hospital billing records to identify patients who received antibiotic injections and cross-referenced with a prospective infection control database of all surgical site infections. The primary outcome measure was shunt infection within 1 year of surgery. Results Five-hundred thirteen adult patients met inclusion criteria. Antibiotic reservoir injection was associated with a significantly lower rate of infection (2.6{\%}) when compared with no injection (6.3{\%}, P = 0.0455). The antibiotic injection group also included significantly more patients with infection risk factors than the control group (38.8{\%} vs. 18.0{\%}, P < 0.005). Conclusion Antibiotic reservoir injection is an effective method of reducing shunt infections in adults when combined with standard infection control measures.",
keywords = "Antibiotic reservoir injection, Antibiotic-impregnated shunt system, Infection, Key words Adults, Ventricular shunts",
author = "Burrows, {Anthony M.} and Murphy, {Meghan E.} and David Daniels and Meyer, {Fredric B.}",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.wneu.2016.01.077",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "89",
pages = "108--111",
journal = "World Neurosurgery",
issn = "1878-8750",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Antibiotic Reservoir Injection Reduces Shunt Infection in Adults

AU - Burrows, Anthony M.

AU - Murphy, Meghan E.

AU - Daniels, David

AU - Meyer, Fredric B.

PY - 2016/5/1

Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - Background Shunt infections are a major complication following ventricular shunts in adults that lead to increased heath care costs, patient morbidity, and mortality. Methods to decrease shunt infection include antibiotic-impregnated catheters, protocol-based surgery, and shunt reservoir antibiotic injection. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review was performed for all adult shunt surgeries performed from January 2000 to September 2013 at a single academic institution. Records were cross-indexed with hospital billing records to identify patients who received antibiotic injections and cross-referenced with a prospective infection control database of all surgical site infections. The primary outcome measure was shunt infection within 1 year of surgery. Results Five-hundred thirteen adult patients met inclusion criteria. Antibiotic reservoir injection was associated with a significantly lower rate of infection (2.6%) when compared with no injection (6.3%, P = 0.0455). The antibiotic injection group also included significantly more patients with infection risk factors than the control group (38.8% vs. 18.0%, P < 0.005). Conclusion Antibiotic reservoir injection is an effective method of reducing shunt infections in adults when combined with standard infection control measures.

AB - Background Shunt infections are a major complication following ventricular shunts in adults that lead to increased heath care costs, patient morbidity, and mortality. Methods to decrease shunt infection include antibiotic-impregnated catheters, protocol-based surgery, and shunt reservoir antibiotic injection. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review was performed for all adult shunt surgeries performed from January 2000 to September 2013 at a single academic institution. Records were cross-indexed with hospital billing records to identify patients who received antibiotic injections and cross-referenced with a prospective infection control database of all surgical site infections. The primary outcome measure was shunt infection within 1 year of surgery. Results Five-hundred thirteen adult patients met inclusion criteria. Antibiotic reservoir injection was associated with a significantly lower rate of infection (2.6%) when compared with no injection (6.3%, P = 0.0455). The antibiotic injection group also included significantly more patients with infection risk factors than the control group (38.8% vs. 18.0%, P < 0.005). Conclusion Antibiotic reservoir injection is an effective method of reducing shunt infections in adults when combined with standard infection control measures.

KW - Antibiotic reservoir injection

KW - Antibiotic-impregnated shunt system

KW - Infection

KW - Key words Adults

KW - Ventricular shunts

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84960116284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84960116284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.01.077

DO - 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.01.077

M3 - Article

C2 - 26852711

AN - SCOPUS:84960116284

VL - 89

SP - 108

EP - 111

JO - World Neurosurgery

JF - World Neurosurgery

SN - 1878-8750

ER -