Analysis of Lower Extremity Proprioception for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention: Current Opinion

Takashi Nagai, Nathan Schilaty, Jeffrey D. Strauss, Eric M. Crowley, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries—such as ACL injury—are common, and the majority of those injuries occur without external player contact. In order to prevent non-contact musculoskeletal injuries, athletes must rely on accurate sensory information (such as visual, vestibular, and somatosensory) and stabilize joints during athletic tasks. Previously, proprioception tests (the senses of joint position, movement, tension or force) have been examined using static tests. Due to the role of proprioception in achievement of joint stability, it is essential to explore the development of dynamic proprioception tests. In this current opinion, the basic background on proprioception is covered, and the research gaps and future directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalSports Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 27 2018

Fingerprint

Proprioception
Lower Extremity
Joints
Wounds and Injuries
Athletes
Sports
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Analysis of Lower Extremity Proprioception for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention : Current Opinion. / Nagai, Takashi; Schilaty, Nathan; Strauss, Jeffrey D.; Crowley, Eric M.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Sports Medicine, 27.02.2018, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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