Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking increase the frequency of p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer

Steven A. Ahrendt, John T. Chow, Stephen C. Yang, Li Wu, Mei Jie Zhang, Jin Jen, David Sidransky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a strong association between tobacco use and lung cancer; however, the genetic targets of these carcinogens and the role of other environmental agents in this process have yet to be defined. We examined the contribution of alcohol use and cigarette smoking to p53 gene mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected by sequence analysis in 105 patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Patient characteristics significantly associated with p53 gene mutations were determined using logistic regression. Mutations in the p53 gene were present in 53% of the patients (56 of 105). p53 mutations were more common in patients who used alcohol than in patients who consumed less than one drink per day (72 versus 39%; P = 0.003), and were detected more often smokers than nonsmokers (58% versus 10%, P = 0.02). Mutations in the p53 gene were present more often (P = 0.01) in alcohol drinkers who smoked cigarettes [76% (31 of 41)], than in nondrinkers (<1 drink per day) who smoked cigarettes [42% (20 of 48)] or in nondrinkers who did not smoke [14% (1 of 7)]. In conclusion, alcohol consumption and tobacco use are both associated with p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer. The link between exposure to both alcohol and tobacco and p53 mutations raises the possibility that alcohol may enhance the mutagenic effects of cigarette smoke in the lung.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3155-3159
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Research
Volume60
Issue number12
StatePublished - Jun 15 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Mutation Rate
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
p53 Genes
Mutation
Alcohols
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Use
Smoke
Carcinogens
Tobacco
Sequence Analysis
Epidemiologic Studies
Lung Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Ahrendt, S. A., Chow, J. T., Yang, S. C., Wu, L., Zhang, M. J., Jen, J., & Sidransky, D. (2000). Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking increase the frequency of p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer. Cancer Research, 60(12), 3155-3159.

Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking increase the frequency of p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer. / Ahrendt, Steven A.; Chow, John T.; Yang, Stephen C.; Wu, Li; Zhang, Mei Jie; Jen, Jin; Sidransky, David.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 60, No. 12, 15.06.2000, p. 3155-3159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahrendt, SA, Chow, JT, Yang, SC, Wu, L, Zhang, MJ, Jen, J & Sidransky, D 2000, 'Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking increase the frequency of p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer', Cancer Research, vol. 60, no. 12, pp. 3155-3159.
Ahrendt SA, Chow JT, Yang SC, Wu L, Zhang MJ, Jen J et al. Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking increase the frequency of p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer. Cancer Research. 2000 Jun 15;60(12):3155-3159.
Ahrendt, Steven A. ; Chow, John T. ; Yang, Stephen C. ; Wu, Li ; Zhang, Mei Jie ; Jen, Jin ; Sidransky, David. / Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking increase the frequency of p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer. In: Cancer Research. 2000 ; Vol. 60, No. 12. pp. 3155-3159.
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