Agreement between self-report questionnaires and medical record data was substantial for diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke but not for heart failure

Yuji Okura, Lynn H. Urban, Douglas W. Mahoney, Steven J. Jacobsen, Richard J. Rodeheffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

786 Scopus citations

Abstract

Questionnaires are used to estimate disease burden. Agreement between questionnaire responses and a criterion standard is important for optimal disease prevalence estimates. We measured the agreement between self-reported disease and medical record diagnosis of disease. A total of 2,037 Olmsted County, Minnesota residents ≥45 years of age were randomly selected. Questionnaires asked if subjects had ever had heart failure, diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke. Medical records were abstracted. Self-report of disease showed >90% specificity for all these diseases, but sensitivity was low for heart failure (69%) and diabetes (66%). Agreement between self-report and medical record was substantial (kappa 0.71-0.80) for diabetes, hypertension, MI, and stroke but not for heart failure (kappa 0.46). Factors associated with high total agreement by multivariate analysis were age <65 years, female sex, education >12 years, and zero Charlson Index score (P <. 05). Questionnaire data are of greatest value in life-threatening, acute-onset diseases (e.g., MI and stroke) and chronic disorders requiring ongoing management (e.g.,diabetes and hypertension). They are more accurate in young women and better-educated subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1096-1103
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume57
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Epidemiologic methods
  • Questionnaires
  • Recall
  • Reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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