Age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists

Kathrin LaFaver, Janis M. Miyasaki, Christopher M. Keran, Carol Rheaume, Lisa Gulya, Kerry H. Levin, Elaine C. Jones, Heidi B. Schwarz, Jennifer R. Molano, Amy Hessler, Divya Singhal, Tait D. Shanafelt, Jeff A Sloan, Paul J. Novotny, Terrence L. Cascino, Neil A. Busis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative analyses of men's (n = 1,091) and women's (n = 580) responses to a 2016 survey of US neurologists. RESULTS: Emotional exhaustion in neurologists initially increased with age, then started to decrease as neurologists got older. Depersonalization decreased as neurologists got older. Fatigue and overall quality of life in neurologists initially worsened with age, then started to improve as neurologists got older. More women (64.6%) than men (57.8%) met burnout criteria on univariate analysis. Women respondents were younger and more likely to work in academic and employed positions. Sex was not an independent predictive factor of burnout, fatigue, or overall quality of life after controlling for age. In both men and women, greater autonomy, meaning in work, reasonable amount of clerical tasks, and having effective support staff were associated with lower burnout risk. More hours worked, more nights on call, higher outpatient volume, and higher percent of time in clinical practice were associated with higher burnout risk. For women, greater number of weekends doing hospital rounds was associated with higher burnout risk. Women neurologists made proportionately more negative comments than men regarding workload, work-life balance, leadership and deterioration of professionalism, and demands of productivity eroding the academic mission. CONCLUSIONS: We identified differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in neurologists by age and sex. This may aid in developing strategies to prevent and mitigate burnout and promote professional fulfillment for different demographic subgroups of neurologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e1928-e1941
JournalNeurology
Volume91
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 13 2018

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Sex Characteristics
Fatigue
Professional Burnout
Quality of Life
Neurologists
Depersonalization
Workload
Outpatients
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

LaFaver, K., Miyasaki, J. M., Keran, C. M., Rheaume, C., Gulya, L., Levin, K. H., ... Busis, N. A. (2018). Age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. Neurology, 91(20), e1928-e1941. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006497

Age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. / LaFaver, Kathrin; Miyasaki, Janis M.; Keran, Christopher M.; Rheaume, Carol; Gulya, Lisa; Levin, Kerry H.; Jones, Elaine C.; Schwarz, Heidi B.; Molano, Jennifer R.; Hessler, Amy; Singhal, Divya; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Sloan, Jeff A; Novotny, Paul J.; Cascino, Terrence L.; Busis, Neil A.

In: Neurology, Vol. 91, No. 20, 13.11.2018, p. e1928-e1941.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

LaFaver, K, Miyasaki, JM, Keran, CM, Rheaume, C, Gulya, L, Levin, KH, Jones, EC, Schwarz, HB, Molano, JR, Hessler, A, Singhal, D, Shanafelt, TD, Sloan, JA, Novotny, PJ, Cascino, TL & Busis, NA 2018, 'Age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists', Neurology, vol. 91, no. 20, pp. e1928-e1941. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006497
LaFaver K, Miyasaki JM, Keran CM, Rheaume C, Gulya L, Levin KH et al. Age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. Neurology. 2018 Nov 13;91(20):e1928-e1941. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006497
LaFaver, Kathrin ; Miyasaki, Janis M. ; Keran, Christopher M. ; Rheaume, Carol ; Gulya, Lisa ; Levin, Kerry H. ; Jones, Elaine C. ; Schwarz, Heidi B. ; Molano, Jennifer R. ; Hessler, Amy ; Singhal, Divya ; Shanafelt, Tait D. ; Sloan, Jeff A ; Novotny, Paul J. ; Cascino, Terrence L. ; Busis, Neil A. / Age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. In: Neurology. 2018 ; Vol. 91, No. 20. pp. e1928-e1941.
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AU - Gulya, Lisa

AU - Levin, Kerry H.

AU - Jones, Elaine C.

AU - Schwarz, Heidi B.

AU - Molano, Jennifer R.

AU - Hessler, Amy

AU - Singhal, Divya

AU - Shanafelt, Tait D.

AU - Sloan, Jeff A

AU - Novotny, Paul J.

AU - Cascino, Terrence L.

AU - Busis, Neil A.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine age and sex differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative analyses of men's (n = 1,091) and women's (n = 580) responses to a 2016 survey of US neurologists. RESULTS: Emotional exhaustion in neurologists initially increased with age, then started to decrease as neurologists got older. Depersonalization decreased as neurologists got older. Fatigue and overall quality of life in neurologists initially worsened with age, then started to improve as neurologists got older. More women (64.6%) than men (57.8%) met burnout criteria on univariate analysis. Women respondents were younger and more likely to work in academic and employed positions. Sex was not an independent predictive factor of burnout, fatigue, or overall quality of life after controlling for age. In both men and women, greater autonomy, meaning in work, reasonable amount of clerical tasks, and having effective support staff were associated with lower burnout risk. More hours worked, more nights on call, higher outpatient volume, and higher percent of time in clinical practice were associated with higher burnout risk. For women, greater number of weekends doing hospital rounds was associated with higher burnout risk. Women neurologists made proportionately more negative comments than men regarding workload, work-life balance, leadership and deterioration of professionalism, and demands of productivity eroding the academic mission. CONCLUSIONS: We identified differences in burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in neurologists by age and sex. This may aid in developing strategies to prevent and mitigate burnout and promote professional fulfillment for different demographic subgroups of neurologists.

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