Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-damaged IgG and IgM autoantibodies to IgG-AGE in patients with early synovitis.

Marianna M. Newkirk, Raphaela Goldbach-Mansky, Jennifer Lee, Joseph Hoxworth, Angie McCoy, Cheryl Yarboro, John Klippel, Hani S. El-Gabalawy

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Abstract

Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-damaged IgG occurs as a result of hyperglycemia and/or oxidative stress. Autoantibodies to IgG-AGE were previously demonstrated in patients with severe, longstanding rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated whether IgG-AGE and anti-IgG-AGE antibodies were present early in the course of RA and other inflammatory arthropathies. We prospectively followed a cohort of 238 patients with inflammatory arthritis of duration less than 1 year. Patients were evaluated clinically and serologically, and radiographs were obtained at initial and 1-year visits. Sera were assayed for IgG-AGE and anti-IgG-AGE antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Rheumatoid factor (RF) was determined by nephelometry and ELISA. Of all patients, 29% had RF-positive RA, 15% had RF-negative RA, 18% had spondyloarthropathy, and 38% had undifferentiated arthritis. IgG-AGE was present in 19% of patients, and was similar in amount and frequency in all groups. Patients with elevated IgG-AGE levels had significantly higher levels of the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but there was no correlation with blood glucose levels. Overall, 27% of the patients had IgM anti-IgG-AGE antibodies. These antibodies were highly significantly associated with RFs (P < 0.0001) and with swollen joint count (P < 0.01). In early onset arthritis, IgG damaged by AGE was detected in all patient groups. The ability to make IgM anti-IgG-AGE antibodies, however, was restricted to a subset of RF-positive RA patients with more active disease. The persistence of the anti-IgG-AGE response was more specific to RA, and was transient in the patients with spondyloarthropathy and with undifferentiated arthritis who were initially found to be positive for anti-IgG-AGE antibodies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArthritis Research & Therapy
Volume5
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Advanced Glycosylation End Products
Synovitis
Autoantibodies
Immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatoid Factor
Arthritis
Antibodies
Spondylarthropathies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Nephelometry and Turbidimetry
Joint Diseases
Blood Sedimentation
Hyperglycemia
C-Reactive Protein
Blood Glucose
anti-IgG
Oxidative Stress

Cite this

Newkirk, M. M., Goldbach-Mansky, R., Lee, J., Hoxworth, J., McCoy, A., Yarboro, C., ... El-Gabalawy, H. S. (2003). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-damaged IgG and IgM autoantibodies to IgG-AGE in patients with early synovitis. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 5(2).

Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-damaged IgG and IgM autoantibodies to IgG-AGE in patients with early synovitis. / Newkirk, Marianna M.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lee, Jennifer; Hoxworth, Joseph; McCoy, Angie; Yarboro, Cheryl; Klippel, John; El-Gabalawy, Hani S.

In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newkirk, MM, Goldbach-Mansky, R, Lee, J, Hoxworth, J, McCoy, A, Yarboro, C, Klippel, J & El-Gabalawy, HS 2003, 'Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-damaged IgG and IgM autoantibodies to IgG-AGE in patients with early synovitis.', Arthritis Research & Therapy, vol. 5, no. 2.
Newkirk, Marianna M. ; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela ; Lee, Jennifer ; Hoxworth, Joseph ; McCoy, Angie ; Yarboro, Cheryl ; Klippel, John ; El-Gabalawy, Hani S. / Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-damaged IgG and IgM autoantibodies to IgG-AGE in patients with early synovitis. In: Arthritis Research & Therapy. 2003 ; Vol. 5, No. 2.
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AU - McCoy, Angie

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