Acute lymphocytic leukemia in adults

A retrospective study and analysis of current management options

T. C. Ho, Ayalew Tefferi, J. Q. Su, Mark R Litzow, H. C. Hoagland, P. Noel

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Abstract

Objective: To examine current therapeutic modalities for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults, analyze prognostic variables, and offer treatment recommendations. Design: We reviewed our experience with 90 adult patients with ALL examined at the Mayo Clinic between 1982 and 1992 and used it as a background for discussion of prognostic factors and management options in adult patients with ALL. Material and Methods: The pretreatment characteristics of patients, types of induction chemotherapy, and postremission treatment, including bone marrow transplantation (BMT), were analyzed for prognostic significance for each of three outcomes: complete remission (CR) rate, duration of CR, and overall survival of patients. Results: Of the 90 study patients, 80 had received induction chemotherapy. Overall long-term survival for treated patients was 25%. None of the 10 patients younger than 18 years of age underwent BMT, and their long-term survival was 80%. Of the other 70 patients, who were 18 years old or older, 42 (60%) had a CR with induction chemotherapy. Of these 42 patients, 31 did not undergo BMT, and their long-term survival was less than 13%. BMT was done in six patients during a first CR (with 100% survival), in four during a later CR (with 50% survival), and in six with disease (with 17% survival). The median age of patients who received chemotherapy was 50 years (range, 19 to 87) and that of patients who underwent BMT was 34 years (range, 18 to 46). Overall, age was the only significant prognostic factor. Conclusion: With our application of current chemotherapy, the outcome in adult patients (18 years old or older) with ALL was dismal. The results were considerably better in patients younger than 18 years of age or in those who underwent BMT as post- remission therapy. Comprehensive assessment of our experience and that in the literature, however, did not resolve issues about current management. Participation of patients in comparative trials is critical for determining the best therapy for ALL in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)937-948
Number of pages12
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume69
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1994

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Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Retrospective Studies
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Survival
Induction Chemotherapy
Therapeutics
Patient Participation
Remission Induction
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Acute lymphocytic leukemia in adults : A retrospective study and analysis of current management options. / Ho, T. C.; Tefferi, Ayalew; Su, J. Q.; Litzow, Mark R; Hoagland, H. C.; Noel, P.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 69, No. 10, 1994, p. 937-948.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Acute lymphocytic leukemia in adults: A retrospective study and analysis of current management options",
abstract = "Objective: To examine current therapeutic modalities for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults, analyze prognostic variables, and offer treatment recommendations. Design: We reviewed our experience with 90 adult patients with ALL examined at the Mayo Clinic between 1982 and 1992 and used it as a background for discussion of prognostic factors and management options in adult patients with ALL. Material and Methods: The pretreatment characteristics of patients, types of induction chemotherapy, and postremission treatment, including bone marrow transplantation (BMT), were analyzed for prognostic significance for each of three outcomes: complete remission (CR) rate, duration of CR, and overall survival of patients. Results: Of the 90 study patients, 80 had received induction chemotherapy. Overall long-term survival for treated patients was 25{\%}. None of the 10 patients younger than 18 years of age underwent BMT, and their long-term survival was 80{\%}. Of the other 70 patients, who were 18 years old or older, 42 (60{\%}) had a CR with induction chemotherapy. Of these 42 patients, 31 did not undergo BMT, and their long-term survival was less than 13{\%}. BMT was done in six patients during a first CR (with 100{\%} survival), in four during a later CR (with 50{\%} survival), and in six with disease (with 17{\%} survival). The median age of patients who received chemotherapy was 50 years (range, 19 to 87) and that of patients who underwent BMT was 34 years (range, 18 to 46). Overall, age was the only significant prognostic factor. Conclusion: With our application of current chemotherapy, the outcome in adult patients (18 years old or older) with ALL was dismal. The results were considerably better in patients younger than 18 years of age or in those who underwent BMT as post- remission therapy. Comprehensive assessment of our experience and that in the literature, however, did not resolve issues about current management. Participation of patients in comparative trials is critical for determining the best therapy for ALL in adults.",
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AU - Hoagland, H. C.

AU - Noel, P.

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N2 - Objective: To examine current therapeutic modalities for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults, analyze prognostic variables, and offer treatment recommendations. Design: We reviewed our experience with 90 adult patients with ALL examined at the Mayo Clinic between 1982 and 1992 and used it as a background for discussion of prognostic factors and management options in adult patients with ALL. Material and Methods: The pretreatment characteristics of patients, types of induction chemotherapy, and postremission treatment, including bone marrow transplantation (BMT), were analyzed for prognostic significance for each of three outcomes: complete remission (CR) rate, duration of CR, and overall survival of patients. Results: Of the 90 study patients, 80 had received induction chemotherapy. Overall long-term survival for treated patients was 25%. None of the 10 patients younger than 18 years of age underwent BMT, and their long-term survival was 80%. Of the other 70 patients, who were 18 years old or older, 42 (60%) had a CR with induction chemotherapy. Of these 42 patients, 31 did not undergo BMT, and their long-term survival was less than 13%. BMT was done in six patients during a first CR (with 100% survival), in four during a later CR (with 50% survival), and in six with disease (with 17% survival). The median age of patients who received chemotherapy was 50 years (range, 19 to 87) and that of patients who underwent BMT was 34 years (range, 18 to 46). Overall, age was the only significant prognostic factor. Conclusion: With our application of current chemotherapy, the outcome in adult patients (18 years old or older) with ALL was dismal. The results were considerably better in patients younger than 18 years of age or in those who underwent BMT as post- remission therapy. Comprehensive assessment of our experience and that in the literature, however, did not resolve issues about current management. Participation of patients in comparative trials is critical for determining the best therapy for ALL in adults.

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