Abnormal postcibal antral and small bowel motility due to neuropathy or myopathy in systemic sclerosis

Martin P. Greydanus, Michael Camilleri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two hypotheses were tested: first, that postcibal motility disorders occur in both the antrum and small bowel of systemic sclerosis patients with gastrointestinal symptoms; second, that dysmotility may result from a neuropathic stage in this disease. Upper gut perfusion manometry (3 h fasting, 2 h fed) was performed and compared with data from similarly studied healthy laboratory controls (n = 15). Only 1 of 8 scleroderma patients had an interdigestive motor complex during the 3-h fasting period [0.1 ± 0.1 (SEM) for systemic sclerosis vs. 1.4 ± 0.16 (SEM) for controls, p <0.05]; 2 other patients had fasting duodenal incoordinated bursts of phasic pressure activity in the duodenum or proximal jejunum. Distal antral motility index [MI = In (sum of amplitude × number of contractions + 1)] was lower (12.4 ± 0.5, p <0.01) than that in controls (14.4 ± 0.14); both the amplitude and frequency of antral pressure activity were lower (p <0.05) in systemic sclerosis. The intestinal fed pattern was characterized by reduced amplitude and frequency of contractions in 6 patients; 2 patients had excessive phasic or tonic small bowel pressure activity, or both. Thus, antral hypomotility is present in most symptomatic scleroderma patients; proximal small bowel postcibal motility is characteristically reduced; a minority of such patients have incoordinated fasting or postcibal hypermotility suggestive of a neuropathy. Manometry identifies the type and region of dysmotility in systemic sclerosis; our results suggest that there are neuropathic and myopathic stages of the upper gut involvement in systemic sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-115
Number of pages6
JournalGastroenterology
Volume96
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Systemic Scleroderma
Muscular Diseases
Fasting
Manometry
Pressure
Jejunum
Antral
Duodenum
Perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Abnormal postcibal antral and small bowel motility due to neuropathy or myopathy in systemic sclerosis. / Greydanus, Martin P.; Camilleri, Michael.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 96, No. 1, 1989, p. 110-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e42246bcc317415abfd63c2a1e4c57f3,
title = "Abnormal postcibal antral and small bowel motility due to neuropathy or myopathy in systemic sclerosis",
abstract = "Two hypotheses were tested: first, that postcibal motility disorders occur in both the antrum and small bowel of systemic sclerosis patients with gastrointestinal symptoms; second, that dysmotility may result from a neuropathic stage in this disease. Upper gut perfusion manometry (3 h fasting, 2 h fed) was performed and compared with data from similarly studied healthy laboratory controls (n = 15). Only 1 of 8 scleroderma patients had an interdigestive motor complex during the 3-h fasting period [0.1 ± 0.1 (SEM) for systemic sclerosis vs. 1.4 ± 0.16 (SEM) for controls, p <0.05]; 2 other patients had fasting duodenal incoordinated bursts of phasic pressure activity in the duodenum or proximal jejunum. Distal antral motility index [MI = In (sum of amplitude × number of contractions + 1)] was lower (12.4 ± 0.5, p <0.01) than that in controls (14.4 ± 0.14); both the amplitude and frequency of antral pressure activity were lower (p <0.05) in systemic sclerosis. The intestinal fed pattern was characterized by reduced amplitude and frequency of contractions in 6 patients; 2 patients had excessive phasic or tonic small bowel pressure activity, or both. Thus, antral hypomotility is present in most symptomatic scleroderma patients; proximal small bowel postcibal motility is characteristically reduced; a minority of such patients have incoordinated fasting or postcibal hypermotility suggestive of a neuropathy. Manometry identifies the type and region of dysmotility in systemic sclerosis; our results suggest that there are neuropathic and myopathic stages of the upper gut involvement in systemic sclerosis.",
author = "Greydanus, {Martin P.} and Michael Camilleri",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "110--115",
journal = "Gastroenterology",
issn = "0016-5085",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abnormal postcibal antral and small bowel motility due to neuropathy or myopathy in systemic sclerosis

AU - Greydanus, Martin P.

AU - Camilleri, Michael

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - Two hypotheses were tested: first, that postcibal motility disorders occur in both the antrum and small bowel of systemic sclerosis patients with gastrointestinal symptoms; second, that dysmotility may result from a neuropathic stage in this disease. Upper gut perfusion manometry (3 h fasting, 2 h fed) was performed and compared with data from similarly studied healthy laboratory controls (n = 15). Only 1 of 8 scleroderma patients had an interdigestive motor complex during the 3-h fasting period [0.1 ± 0.1 (SEM) for systemic sclerosis vs. 1.4 ± 0.16 (SEM) for controls, p <0.05]; 2 other patients had fasting duodenal incoordinated bursts of phasic pressure activity in the duodenum or proximal jejunum. Distal antral motility index [MI = In (sum of amplitude × number of contractions + 1)] was lower (12.4 ± 0.5, p <0.01) than that in controls (14.4 ± 0.14); both the amplitude and frequency of antral pressure activity were lower (p <0.05) in systemic sclerosis. The intestinal fed pattern was characterized by reduced amplitude and frequency of contractions in 6 patients; 2 patients had excessive phasic or tonic small bowel pressure activity, or both. Thus, antral hypomotility is present in most symptomatic scleroderma patients; proximal small bowel postcibal motility is characteristically reduced; a minority of such patients have incoordinated fasting or postcibal hypermotility suggestive of a neuropathy. Manometry identifies the type and region of dysmotility in systemic sclerosis; our results suggest that there are neuropathic and myopathic stages of the upper gut involvement in systemic sclerosis.

AB - Two hypotheses were tested: first, that postcibal motility disorders occur in both the antrum and small bowel of systemic sclerosis patients with gastrointestinal symptoms; second, that dysmotility may result from a neuropathic stage in this disease. Upper gut perfusion manometry (3 h fasting, 2 h fed) was performed and compared with data from similarly studied healthy laboratory controls (n = 15). Only 1 of 8 scleroderma patients had an interdigestive motor complex during the 3-h fasting period [0.1 ± 0.1 (SEM) for systemic sclerosis vs. 1.4 ± 0.16 (SEM) for controls, p <0.05]; 2 other patients had fasting duodenal incoordinated bursts of phasic pressure activity in the duodenum or proximal jejunum. Distal antral motility index [MI = In (sum of amplitude × number of contractions + 1)] was lower (12.4 ± 0.5, p <0.01) than that in controls (14.4 ± 0.14); both the amplitude and frequency of antral pressure activity were lower (p <0.05) in systemic sclerosis. The intestinal fed pattern was characterized by reduced amplitude and frequency of contractions in 6 patients; 2 patients had excessive phasic or tonic small bowel pressure activity, or both. Thus, antral hypomotility is present in most symptomatic scleroderma patients; proximal small bowel postcibal motility is characteristically reduced; a minority of such patients have incoordinated fasting or postcibal hypermotility suggestive of a neuropathy. Manometry identifies the type and region of dysmotility in systemic sclerosis; our results suggest that there are neuropathic and myopathic stages of the upper gut involvement in systemic sclerosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024579132&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024579132&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2909417

AN - SCOPUS:0024579132

VL - 96

SP - 110

EP - 115

JO - Gastroenterology

JF - Gastroenterology

SN - 0016-5085

IS - 1

ER -