A prospective study of quality of life in adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas: The impact of the extent of resection on quality of life and survival

Paul D. Brown, Matthew J. Maurer, Teresa A. Rummans, Bruce E. Pollock, Karla V. Ballman, Jeff A Sloan, Bradley F Boeve, Robert M. Arusell, Matthew M Clark, Jan Craig Buckner

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe the quality of life (QOL) over time for adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas and to examine the relationship between QOL and outcome data collected in three prospective cooperative group clinical trials. METHODS: The QOL study was a companion protocol for three Phase II high-grade glioma protocols. Five self-administered forms were completed by patients to assess QOL at study entry, 2 months, and 4 months after enrollment. RESULTS: QOL data were available for baseline, first, and second subsequent follow-up evaluations for 89%, 71%, and 69% of patients, respectively. A significant proportion of patients (47.1%) experienced impaired QOL (QOL ≤ 50) in at least one measure at subsequent evaluations, whereas most patients (88%) with impaired QOL at baseline continued to have impaired QOL at subsequent evaluations. On multivariable analyses, baseline QOL measures were predictive of QOL at the time of follow-up. In addition, patients who underwent a gross total resection were much less likely to have impaired QOL (P = 0.006), were less likely to experience worsening depression (P = 0.0008), and were more likely to have improved QOL (P = 0.003) at their first follow-up evaluation. Changes in QOL measures over time were not found to be associated with survival in multivariable analyses that adjusted for known prognostic variables; variables that were independently associated with improved survival were better performance status (P < 0.001), younger age (P < 0.001), and greater extent of resection (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Baseline QOL was predictive of QOL over time. Gross total resection was associated with longer survival and improved QOL over time for patients with high-grade gliomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-503
Number of pages9
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Glioma
Quality of Life
Prospective Studies
Survival

Keywords

  • Glioblastoma
  • High-grade glioma
  • Prospective studies
  • Quality of life
  • Radiotherapy resection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

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A prospective study of quality of life in adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas : The impact of the extent of resection on quality of life and survival. / Brown, Paul D.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Rummans, Teresa A.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Ballman, Karla V.; Sloan, Jeff A; Boeve, Bradley F; Arusell, Robert M.; Clark, Matthew M; Buckner, Jan Craig.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 57, No. 3, 09.2005, p. 495-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "A prospective study of quality of life in adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas: The impact of the extent of resection on quality of life and survival",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To describe the quality of life (QOL) over time for adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas and to examine the relationship between QOL and outcome data collected in three prospective cooperative group clinical trials. METHODS: The QOL study was a companion protocol for three Phase II high-grade glioma protocols. Five self-administered forms were completed by patients to assess QOL at study entry, 2 months, and 4 months after enrollment. RESULTS: QOL data were available for baseline, first, and second subsequent follow-up evaluations for 89{\%}, 71{\%}, and 69{\%} of patients, respectively. A significant proportion of patients (47.1{\%}) experienced impaired QOL (QOL ≤ 50) in at least one measure at subsequent evaluations, whereas most patients (88{\%}) with impaired QOL at baseline continued to have impaired QOL at subsequent evaluations. On multivariable analyses, baseline QOL measures were predictive of QOL at the time of follow-up. In addition, patients who underwent a gross total resection were much less likely to have impaired QOL (P = 0.006), were less likely to experience worsening depression (P = 0.0008), and were more likely to have improved QOL (P = 0.003) at their first follow-up evaluation. Changes in QOL measures over time were not found to be associated with survival in multivariable analyses that adjusted for known prognostic variables; variables that were independently associated with improved survival were better performance status (P < 0.001), younger age (P < 0.001), and greater extent of resection (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Baseline QOL was predictive of QOL over time. Gross total resection was associated with longer survival and improved QOL over time for patients with high-grade gliomas.",
keywords = "Glioblastoma, High-grade glioma, Prospective studies, Quality of life, Radiotherapy resection",
author = "Brown, {Paul D.} and Maurer, {Matthew J.} and Rummans, {Teresa A.} and Pollock, {Bruce E.} and Ballman, {Karla V.} and Sloan, {Jeff A} and Boeve, {Bradley F} and Arusell, {Robert M.} and Clark, {Matthew M} and Buckner, {Jan Craig}",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - A prospective study of quality of life in adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas

T2 - The impact of the extent of resection on quality of life and survival

AU - Brown, Paul D.

AU - Maurer, Matthew J.

AU - Rummans, Teresa A.

AU - Pollock, Bruce E.

AU - Ballman, Karla V.

AU - Sloan, Jeff A

AU - Boeve, Bradley F

AU - Arusell, Robert M.

AU - Clark, Matthew M

AU - Buckner, Jan Craig

PY - 2005/9

Y1 - 2005/9

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe the quality of life (QOL) over time for adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas and to examine the relationship between QOL and outcome data collected in three prospective cooperative group clinical trials. METHODS: The QOL study was a companion protocol for three Phase II high-grade glioma protocols. Five self-administered forms were completed by patients to assess QOL at study entry, 2 months, and 4 months after enrollment. RESULTS: QOL data were available for baseline, first, and second subsequent follow-up evaluations for 89%, 71%, and 69% of patients, respectively. A significant proportion of patients (47.1%) experienced impaired QOL (QOL ≤ 50) in at least one measure at subsequent evaluations, whereas most patients (88%) with impaired QOL at baseline continued to have impaired QOL at subsequent evaluations. On multivariable analyses, baseline QOL measures were predictive of QOL at the time of follow-up. In addition, patients who underwent a gross total resection were much less likely to have impaired QOL (P = 0.006), were less likely to experience worsening depression (P = 0.0008), and were more likely to have improved QOL (P = 0.003) at their first follow-up evaluation. Changes in QOL measures over time were not found to be associated with survival in multivariable analyses that adjusted for known prognostic variables; variables that were independently associated with improved survival were better performance status (P < 0.001), younger age (P < 0.001), and greater extent of resection (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Baseline QOL was predictive of QOL over time. Gross total resection was associated with longer survival and improved QOL over time for patients with high-grade gliomas.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To describe the quality of life (QOL) over time for adults with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas and to examine the relationship between QOL and outcome data collected in three prospective cooperative group clinical trials. METHODS: The QOL study was a companion protocol for three Phase II high-grade glioma protocols. Five self-administered forms were completed by patients to assess QOL at study entry, 2 months, and 4 months after enrollment. RESULTS: QOL data were available for baseline, first, and second subsequent follow-up evaluations for 89%, 71%, and 69% of patients, respectively. A significant proportion of patients (47.1%) experienced impaired QOL (QOL ≤ 50) in at least one measure at subsequent evaluations, whereas most patients (88%) with impaired QOL at baseline continued to have impaired QOL at subsequent evaluations. On multivariable analyses, baseline QOL measures were predictive of QOL at the time of follow-up. In addition, patients who underwent a gross total resection were much less likely to have impaired QOL (P = 0.006), were less likely to experience worsening depression (P = 0.0008), and were more likely to have improved QOL (P = 0.003) at their first follow-up evaluation. Changes in QOL measures over time were not found to be associated with survival in multivariable analyses that adjusted for known prognostic variables; variables that were independently associated with improved survival were better performance status (P < 0.001), younger age (P < 0.001), and greater extent of resection (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Baseline QOL was predictive of QOL over time. Gross total resection was associated with longer survival and improved QOL over time for patients with high-grade gliomas.

KW - Glioblastoma

KW - High-grade glioma

KW - Prospective studies

KW - Quality of life

KW - Radiotherapy resection

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