A common mutation in the hominoid class I A-locus IFN-responsive element results in the loss of enhancer activity

Abbe N. Vallejo, Kathleen S. Allen, Larry R Pease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the observed coordinate expression of HLA-A and -B antigens in somatic tissues, there is growing evidence that the A and B class I genes are differentially regulated at the transcriptional level. Previous studies indicate that this may be related to locus-specific structural differences in certain enhancer elements. We have recently examined the 5' proximal regulatory regions of the A and B. homologs in the higher non-human primates and found pronounced differences between the locl. Sequence analysis shows the B-promoters are more homogeneous, whereas the A-locus promoters are divergent among the various species examined. The differences in A- and B- promoters is exemplified by the regulatory element referred to as the IFN-responsive element (IRE). While the B-locus IRE is conserved among all primates examined, the A-locus IRE are divergentand reveal different sequences in the human/chimpanzee, gorilla and orang-utan. In reporter gene bioassays, the B-locus IRE exhibited an enhancer activity in response to induction with IFN-β and IFN-γ. In contrast, all the variants of the A-locus IRE found in hominoid primates were unresponsive to IFN. One base substitution shared by all the primate IREs proved to be inactivating. These results provide a molecular basis of how duplicated gene loci encoding structurally and functionally similar antigen-presenting molecules may become differentially responsive to physiological stimulus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-859
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Immunology
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1995

Fingerprint

Primates
Locus
Mutation
Genes
Antigens
Promoter
Gorilla gorilla
MHC Class I Genes
HLA-A Antigens
HLA-B Antigens
Pan troglodytes
Gene
Bioassay
Nucleic Acid Regulatory Sequences
Reporter Genes
Biological Assay
Sequence Analysis
Substitution reactions
Tissue
Molecules

Keywords

  • Class I MHC
  • Evolution
  • Gene expression
  • IRE
  • Promoter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

A common mutation in the hominoid class I A-locus IFN-responsive element results in the loss of enhancer activity. / Vallejo, Abbe N.; Allen, Kathleen S.; Pease, Larry R.

In: International Immunology, Vol. 7, No. 5, 05.1995, p. 853-859.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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