A collagen-based coil for embolization of saccular aneurysms in a New Zealand White rabbit model

David F Kallmes, Naomi H. Fujiwara, Debbie Yuen, Daying Dai, Shu Tung Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In the treatment of cerebral aneurysms, platinum coils often fail to elicit a fibrotic response. We tested the hypothesis that a new, collagen-based endovascular coil would improve angiographic and histologic outcomes as compared with those achieved with platinum coils in a rabbit model of saccular aneurysms. METHODS: Elastase-induced aneurysms were created in 12 New Zealand White rabbits (body weight, 3-4 kg). Embolization was performed either by use of collagen-based coils (n = 6) or platinum coils (n = 6). In both coil groups, subjects were kept alive for either 2 weeks (n = 3 [collagen], n = 3 [platinum]) or 10 weeks (n = 3 [collagen], n = 3 [platinum]) after embolization and then were sacrificed. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed immediately after embolization and immediately before sacrifice. Postmortem histologic analysis of all coils was performed. RESULTS: Collagen-based coils were loosely packed in all cases because of limitations in size of coils available for embolization. In all six aneurysms packed with collagen-based coils, progressive thrombosis was noted at follow-up (DSA). Platinum coil samples were densely packed in all six cases. Progressive thrombosis was seen in one case, and interval regrowth was present in one case. Two weeks after embolization, collagen-based coil samples showed a marked peri-coil cellular response. Ten weeks after embolization, collagen-based samples had dense connective tissue matrix deposition in two of three cases. Platinum coils had unorganized thrombus at 2 weeks; loose-matrix deposition was only seen in the 10-week samples. Smooth muscle actin-positive cells were seen across the neck of the aneurysm in four of six collagen-based coil cases. CONCLUSION: Collagen-based coils show a marked cellular response in animal-model aneurysms, with resultant high rates of progressive occlusion after embolization. Dense matrix deposition is commonly seen with collagen-based coils. This contrasts with low rates of progressive thrombosis and high rates of loose matrix deposition seen with platinum coils.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-596
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 2003

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Aneurysm
Collagen
Platinum
Rabbits
Thrombosis
Digital Subtraction Angiography
Pancreatic Elastase
Intracranial Aneurysm
Connective Tissue
Smooth Muscle
Actins
Animal Models
Body Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

A collagen-based coil for embolization of saccular aneurysms in a New Zealand White rabbit model. / Kallmes, David F; Fujiwara, Naomi H.; Yuen, Debbie; Dai, Daying; Li, Shu Tung.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 24, No. 4, 04.2003, p. 591-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kallmes, David F ; Fujiwara, Naomi H. ; Yuen, Debbie ; Dai, Daying ; Li, Shu Tung. / A collagen-based coil for embolization of saccular aneurysms in a New Zealand White rabbit model. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2003 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 591-596.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In the treatment of cerebral aneurysms, platinum coils often fail to elicit a fibrotic response. We tested the hypothesis that a new, collagen-based endovascular coil would improve angiographic and histologic outcomes as compared with those achieved with platinum coils in a rabbit model of saccular aneurysms. METHODS: Elastase-induced aneurysms were created in 12 New Zealand White rabbits (body weight, 3-4 kg). Embolization was performed either by use of collagen-based coils (n = 6) or platinum coils (n = 6). In both coil groups, subjects were kept alive for either 2 weeks (n = 3 [collagen], n = 3 [platinum]) or 10 weeks (n = 3 [collagen], n = 3 [platinum]) after embolization and then were sacrificed. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed immediately after embolization and immediately before sacrifice. Postmortem histologic analysis of all coils was performed. RESULTS: Collagen-based coils were loosely packed in all cases because of limitations in size of coils available for embolization. In all six aneurysms packed with collagen-based coils, progressive thrombosis was noted at follow-up (DSA). Platinum coil samples were densely packed in all six cases. Progressive thrombosis was seen in one case, and interval regrowth was present in one case. Two weeks after embolization, collagen-based coil samples showed a marked peri-coil cellular response. Ten weeks after embolization, collagen-based samples had dense connective tissue matrix deposition in two of three cases. Platinum coils had unorganized thrombus at 2 weeks; loose-matrix deposition was only seen in the 10-week samples. Smooth muscle actin-positive cells were seen across the neck of the aneurysm in four of six collagen-based coil cases. CONCLUSION: Collagen-based coils show a marked cellular response in animal-model aneurysms, with resultant high rates of progressive occlusion after embolization. Dense matrix deposition is commonly seen with collagen-based coils. This contrasts with low rates of progressive thrombosis and high rates of loose matrix deposition seen with platinum coils.",
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AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In the treatment of cerebral aneurysms, platinum coils often fail to elicit a fibrotic response. We tested the hypothesis that a new, collagen-based endovascular coil would improve angiographic and histologic outcomes as compared with those achieved with platinum coils in a rabbit model of saccular aneurysms. METHODS: Elastase-induced aneurysms were created in 12 New Zealand White rabbits (body weight, 3-4 kg). Embolization was performed either by use of collagen-based coils (n = 6) or platinum coils (n = 6). In both coil groups, subjects were kept alive for either 2 weeks (n = 3 [collagen], n = 3 [platinum]) or 10 weeks (n = 3 [collagen], n = 3 [platinum]) after embolization and then were sacrificed. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed immediately after embolization and immediately before sacrifice. Postmortem histologic analysis of all coils was performed. RESULTS: Collagen-based coils were loosely packed in all cases because of limitations in size of coils available for embolization. In all six aneurysms packed with collagen-based coils, progressive thrombosis was noted at follow-up (DSA). Platinum coil samples were densely packed in all six cases. Progressive thrombosis was seen in one case, and interval regrowth was present in one case. Two weeks after embolization, collagen-based coil samples showed a marked peri-coil cellular response. Ten weeks after embolization, collagen-based samples had dense connective tissue matrix deposition in two of three cases. Platinum coils had unorganized thrombus at 2 weeks; loose-matrix deposition was only seen in the 10-week samples. Smooth muscle actin-positive cells were seen across the neck of the aneurysm in four of six collagen-based coil cases. CONCLUSION: Collagen-based coils show a marked cellular response in animal-model aneurysms, with resultant high rates of progressive occlusion after embolization. Dense matrix deposition is commonly seen with collagen-based coils. This contrasts with low rates of progressive thrombosis and high rates of loose matrix deposition seen with platinum coils.

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