A 10-year review of otic lichen planus

The Mayo Clinic experience

Julio Sartori Valinotti, Alison Bruce, Yulia Krotova Khan, Charles W. Beatty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Lichen planus is an autoimmune inflammatory dermatosis that typically affects the skin but can also involve the stratified squamous epithelium of the external auditory canals and tympanic membranes. Here we report our experience with the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of otic lichen planus. OBSERVATIONS: We retrospectively reviewed medical records from January 1, 2001, through May 31, 2011, of patients with a diagnosis of otic lichen planus. Nineteen caseswere identified (mean age at diagnosis, 57 years; 15 women). The most common concerns were persistent otorrhea and hearing loss. Other symptoms included plugging, pruritus, tinnitus, pain, and bleeding. The mean symptom durationwas 4.0 years (n = 13). Most patients responded well to topical tacrolimus within several months. One patient had a dramatic positive response to rituximab. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Otic lichen planus can lead to persistent hearing loss and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of relentless otorrhea and external auditory canal stenosis. In our experience, topical tacrolimus is the best primary treatment, but alternative therapies could be instituted in severe cases. Early recognition of the nonspecific symptoms of otic lichen planus may lead to prompt treatment and avoidance of irreparable late sequelae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1082-1086
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA Dermatology
Volume149
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint

Lichen Planus
Ear
Ear Canal
Tacrolimus
Hearing Loss
Tympanic Membrane
Tinnitus
Pruritus
Complementary Therapies
Skin Diseases
Medical Records
Pathologic Constriction
Differential Diagnosis
Epithelium
Hemorrhage
Pain
Skin
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

A 10-year review of otic lichen planus : The Mayo Clinic experience. / Sartori Valinotti, Julio; Bruce, Alison; Krotova Khan, Yulia; Beatty, Charles W.

In: JAMA Dermatology, Vol. 149, No. 9, 01.09.2013, p. 1082-1086.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sartori Valinotti, Julio ; Bruce, Alison ; Krotova Khan, Yulia ; Beatty, Charles W. / A 10-year review of otic lichen planus : The Mayo Clinic experience. In: JAMA Dermatology. 2013 ; Vol. 149, No. 9. pp. 1082-1086.
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