Younger age at initiation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination series is associated with higher rates of on-time completion

Jennifer St. Sauver, Lila J Rutten, Jon Owen Ebbert, Debra J. Jacobson, Michaela E. McGree, Robert M. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vaccination rates for human papillomavirus (HPV) have remained disappointingly low. It is critical to identify methods to increase on-time vaccine series completion rates (before 13 or 15. years). To determine whether younger age (9 to 10. years of age) at HPV vaccine series initiation was associated with improved on-time completion rates compared to initiation at 11 to 12. years, we examined the prevalence of on-time HPV vaccine series completion rates from August 2006 through December 2012 in a large, population-based cohort of children and adolescents (aged 9.5 to 27. years) residing in Olmsted County, MN on December 31, 2012 (n = 36,223). We compared age at vaccine initiation between individuals who successfully completed both 2 and 3 doses of the vaccination series on-time (before age 13.5 or 15.0. years) using multivariate logistic regression. On-time completion of both 2 and 3 doses of the vaccine series by age 13.5 or 15.0. years was significantly associated with initiation at 9 to 10. years as compared to 11 to 12. years after adjusting for sex, race, insurance status, frequent health care visits, and year of first vaccination (all p.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPreventive Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 28 2015

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Vaccination
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Vaccines
Insurance Coverage
Logistic Models
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Keywords

  • Immunization
  • Immunization programs
  • Papillomavirus vaccines, vaccination
  • Patient acceptance of health care
  • Patient compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

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abstract = "Vaccination rates for human papillomavirus (HPV) have remained disappointingly low. It is critical to identify methods to increase on-time vaccine series completion rates (before 13 or 15. years). To determine whether younger age (9 to 10. years of age) at HPV vaccine series initiation was associated with improved on-time completion rates compared to initiation at 11 to 12. years, we examined the prevalence of on-time HPV vaccine series completion rates from August 2006 through December 2012 in a large, population-based cohort of children and adolescents (aged 9.5 to 27. years) residing in Olmsted County, MN on December 31, 2012 (n = 36,223). We compared age at vaccine initiation between individuals who successfully completed both 2 and 3 doses of the vaccination series on-time (before age 13.5 or 15.0. years) using multivariate logistic regression. On-time completion of both 2 and 3 doses of the vaccine series by age 13.5 or 15.0. years was significantly associated with initiation at 9 to 10. years as compared to 11 to 12. years after adjusting for sex, race, insurance status, frequent health care visits, and year of first vaccination (all p.",
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AU - McGree, Michaela E.

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