Yes/No versus forced-choice recognition memory in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

Patterns of impairment and associations with dementia severity

Lindsay R. Clark, Nikki Stricker, David J. Libon, Lisa Delano-Wood, David P. Salmon, Dean C. Delis, Mark W. Bondi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Memory tests are sensitive to early identification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) but less useful as the disease advances. However, assessing particular types of recognition memory may better characterize dementia severity in later stages of AD. We sought to examine patterns of recognition memory deficits in individuals with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Memory performance and global cognition data were collected from participants with AD (n=37), MCI (n=37), and cognitively intact older adults (normal controls, NC; n=35). One-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) examined differences between groups on yes/no and forced-choice recognition measures. Individuals with amnestic MCI performed worse than NC and nonamnestic MCI participants on yes/no recognition, but were comparable on forced-choice recognition. AD patients were more impaired across yes/no and forced-choice recognition tasks. Individuals with mild AD (120 Dementia Rating Scale, DRS) performed better than those with moderate-to-severe AD (<120 DRS) on forced-choice recognition, but were equally impaired on yes/no recognition. There were differences in the relationships between learning, recall, and recognition performance across groups. Although yes/no recognition testing may be sensitive to MCI, forced-choice procedures may provide utility in assessing severity of anterograde amnesia in later stages of AD. Implications for assessment of insufficient effort and malingering are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1201-1216
Number of pages16
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Anterograde Amnesia
Recognition (Psychology)
Cognitive Dysfunction
Alzheimer's Disease
Impairment
Mild Cognitive Impairment
Recognition Memory
Malingering
Memory Disorders
Cognition
Analysis of Variance
Learning

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia severity
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuropsychology
  • Recognition memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Yes/No versus forced-choice recognition memory in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease : Patterns of impairment and associations with dementia severity. / Clark, Lindsay R.; Stricker, Nikki; Libon, David J.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Salmon, David P.; Delis, Dean C.; Bondi, Mark W.

In: Clinical Neuropsychologist, Vol. 26, No. 7, 01.10.2012, p. 1201-1216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clark, Lindsay R. ; Stricker, Nikki ; Libon, David J. ; Delano-Wood, Lisa ; Salmon, David P. ; Delis, Dean C. ; Bondi, Mark W. / Yes/No versus forced-choice recognition memory in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease : Patterns of impairment and associations with dementia severity. In: Clinical Neuropsychologist. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 1201-1216.
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