Wound management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers: From the basics to regenerative medicine

Karen L. Andrews, Matthew T. Houdek, Lester J. Kiemele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hospital-based studies have shown that mortality rates in individuals with diabetic foot ulcers are about twice those observed in individuals with diabetes without foot ulcers. Objective: To assess the etiology and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Study design: Literature review. Methods: Systematic review of the literature discussing management of diabetic foot ulcers. Since there were only a few randomized controlled trials on this topic, articles were selected to attempt to be comprehensive rather than a formal assessment of study quality. Results: Chronic nonhealing foot ulcers occur in approximately 15% of patients with diabetes. Many factors contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing. Risk factors include peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, limited joint mobility, foot deformities, abnormal foot pressures, minor trauma, a history of ulceration or amputation, and impaired visual acuity. With the current treatment for nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, a significant number of patients require amputation. Conclusion: Diabetic foot ulcers are optimally managed by a multidisciplinary integrated team. Offloading and preventative management are important. Dressings play an adjunctive role. There is a critical need to develop novel treatments to improve healing of diabetic foot ulcers. The goal is to have wounds heal and remain healed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-39
Number of pages11
JournalProsthetics and Orthotics International
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Diabetic Foot
Regenerative Medicine
Wounds and Injuries
Foot Ulcer
Amputation
Foot Deformities
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Bandages
Wound Healing
Visual Acuity
Foot
Randomized Controlled Trials
Joints
Pressure
Mortality
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Diabetic foot ulcer
  • Neuropathy
  • Wounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Wound management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers : From the basics to regenerative medicine. / Andrews, Karen L.; Houdek, Matthew T.; Kiemele, Lester J.

In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International, Vol. 39, No. 1, 2015, p. 29-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrews, Karen L. ; Houdek, Matthew T. ; Kiemele, Lester J. / Wound management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers : From the basics to regenerative medicine. In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 29-39.
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